Talk:Fourth Dimension Records

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Text from Grim Humor[edit]

This is the text from the Grim Humor article which has been redirected following AFD. Some info may be suitable for inclusion in this article. Yomanganitalk 23:48, 14 October 2006 (UTC)

Grim Humour began life in 1983 as both a document of, essentially, the post-punk movement of the time and tongue-in-cheek critique of its close cousin, goth. Although it interviewed and reviewed many of the more popular groups from these genres throughout the early editions, it quite quickly embraced post-industrial electronics outfits and other genres, besides writing about films, books and other areas. By 1985, it had become part of the vanguard supporting groups and artists such as Sonic Youth, Swans, Big Black, Lydia Lunch, etc. from the USA whilst remaining equally true to a passion for UK outfits as diverse as Coil, Wire, The Cure, The Fall and more beside. Often unfairly compared to US 'zine, Forced Exposure, during the late '80s and early '90s, it remained true to its own path until a financial setback caused it to implode in 1993, take a number of years out and resurface as the 'occasional journal' (dedicated to electronica, avant-garde, psychedelia, avant-folk, 'experimental', etc.) Adverse Effect, which still exists to this day. Editor Richo also operates the Fourth Dimension and Lumberton Trading Company record labels, plus is involved with the 'abstract soundtrack noir' group, Theme.