Talk:fsck

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Use of fsck to check Unix/Linux file systems[edit]

I would like to know what is the consequence of running the automatic repair with fsck. I come across the website www.namesys.com, and it claims that reiserFS is the fastest, most stable, and most efficient file system. Moreover, it meets the military standards. One point is that when a filesystem is corrupt, the reiserfsck can rebuild the file and directory tree and minimize the loss of data caused by the corruption. I think it is a neat feature. However, I do want to know the consequences of running fsck in ext2 and ext3 file systems. Can anyone solve my puzzle? Dreamcarrior 06:25, 16 October 2007 (UTC)

Usage of Unix/UNIX[edit]

This article uses both 'Unix' and 'UNIX', as does the Unix/UNIX article itself. I do not know what the correct usage is, but I think it is important to at least be consistent throughout each article. Since we cannot correct this by running fsck (unfortunately), I am changing the one instance of 'UNIX' in this article to 'Unix'. Please revert and comment here if you disagree. -- Rishi 22:35, 1 January 2006 (UTC)

"Unix" is the more common usage by Unix users today, and was the one originally preferred by the creators. "UNIX" originates from early manuals which typeset "Unix" with small caps, and was adopted by some standards bodies. --FOo 01:01, 2 January 2006 (UTC)

It's "UNIX" (all-caps) and it's a trademark owned by the Open Group as documented here. The mixed-cased usage is likely violating the trademark but IANAL. Argel1200 (talk) 19:31, 25 June 2008 (UTC)

I suspect "Unix" is genericized anyway due to the common usage of "Unix-like", "Unix compatible", and so on. --FOo (talk) 02:49, 27 June 2008 (UTC)

Unpronounceable?[edit]

I pronounce it just like it's spelled. Awkward, but it can be done. D: FSCK--130.215.171.13 01:33, 19 January 2006 (UTC)

English speakers get really twitchy around words without vowels. I pronounce it (not that I ever say it outloud, how often is that necessary?) as if there were an 'i' between the 'f' and 's.' Megan 02:23, 20 February 2006 (UTC)

profanity[edit]

Brevity is the soul of wit. We don't need to be so detailed about the off-color aspects. Actually, more humorous that way.

fsck in chat[edit]

As far as I know, "fsck" is used in chat instead of the nasty word, since anti-spam bots won't kick you for using that word (as it's a real & innocent word).

I have no "proof" for that, though, nor do I know how to write this without writing profanities and without sounding more confident in it than I am. So if anyone wants to put it in there go ahead. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 85.64.15.22 (talk) 23:19, 19 September 2007 (UTC)

What??[edit]

"Some prefer to just pronounce it as "fuck"" Huh? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.85.216.191 (talk) 20:54, 24 November 2007 (UTC)

I've removed it, it is unnecessary profanity. If someone wants to add it back, please find a more elegant way of saying it. teddybrown (talk) 14:13, 2 January 2008 (UTC)

Use as profanity[edit]

This section seems somewhat immature and not the type of thing you'd find in a first-class reference. This isn't a very long article to begin with so it is even more noticeable. One would think there is more noteworthy content about fsck that should be added before discussing how a very small part of the tech community has apparently adapted the name of the command into slang. Although somewhat anecdotal, I've worked in many tech shops where Linux is prevalent and I've yet to hear someone say "Go fsck yourself!" And if someone did say this, I'd attribute it more as someone telling me to just "Go fuck myself!" since this strong similarity is obviously the nature of the joke anyway. Remember, Wikipedia:Wikipedia_is_not_for_things_made_up_in_school_one_day and I think this is extremely borderline.

A search of Twitter reveals that fsck is used as a form of profanity. It's a fact - period. [|search on Twitter] Barce (talk) 23:50, 20 September 2009 (UTC)

Wikipedia at its worst[edit]

Indeed. The similarity between fsck and the profanity is obvious and I'm sure everyone was aware of it from the start. It is sometimes used in puns, but that's all. Spending so much space on a pointless tangent is very wikipedia. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 213.113.72.148 (talk) 17:49, 7 September 2008 (UTC)

I'm also wondering if the section meets WP's [[WP:NPOV|neutral point of view policy. Also, is there a reason why these IPs are adding an "F" to "uck" in the pronounciation section, or is it vandalism? PCHS-NJROTC (Messages) 22:27, 8 May 2009 (UTC)

Neutrality tag[edit]

The article is tagged for a controversy over whether it's NPOV, but there's no discussion about it here. I'm therefore removing the tag. If someone wants to re-tag it, they need to come in here and explain what they think is NPOV, so we can actually discuss the alleged controversy. 76.92.138.240 (talk) 22:02, 16 May 2009 (UTC)

My bad; the NPOV tag was explained in the section above. The article seems to cover how Fsck is a pest more than anything else, and the "Use as profanity" section really throws the article out of balance. Many words are used in lieu of profanity, not just this. SCANDISK has been similarly labeled "ScamDisk," "ScanDick," and "ScamDick," but there's no mention of its haters on its article. ChkDsk is sometimes referred to as ChkDck ("Check Dick" instead of "Check Disk"). PCHS-NJROTC (Messages) 03:16, 23 May 2009 (UTC)

Homepage?[edit]

Does this software not have a project homepage that contains the source code and binaries? I did a search for "fsck source code" and didn't see anything right off. I thought Wikipedia always linked to a software's home page or source someplace. Yfrwlf (talk) 18:55, 24 March 2012 (UTC)