Talk:Kuskokwim River

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Longest rivers entirely in one state[edit]

The longest and largest river entirely in one state is the Kuskokwim in Alaska, 720 miles long and a 41,000 cubic ft./sec. average discharge. It's followed by: 2. Trinity River, Texas 710 / 7,100 3. Sacramento - Pit, California 690 /15,000 4. Tanana, Alaska 660 / 24,000 5. Koyukuk, Alaska 520 / 14,000 6. Innoko, Alaska 500 7. Altamaha, Georgia 470 / 14,000 8. Yazoo, Mississippi 465 / 10,000 9. Guadalupe, Texas 460 / 2,100 10. Kentucky, Kentucky 430 / 8,300 11. Salmon, Idaho 420 / 11,000 12. James, Virginia 410 / 7,500 River lengths are always measured in official lists along the longest watercourse/tirbutary. Sources: USGS and World Facts and Figures (John Wiley and Sons)DLinth (talk) 19:51, 25 December 2007 (UTC)

" It is the longest free flowing river in the United States."[edit]

I don't see a reference for this statement, but the Yukon, for one, is longer and, to my knowledge, completely free-flowing as well. Perhaps the author if this sentence excludes the Yukon because it isn't entirely in the US? Terry Thorgaard (talk) 20:04, 31 December 2014 (UTC)

Correction: the article on the Yukon River indicates that There [is] a dam across the river ... The construction of the dam flooded the White Horse Rapids, which gave the city [of Whitehorse] its name, and created Schwatka Lake." Thus, it seems, the Yukon isn't completely free-flowing. Terry Thorgaard (talk) 20:34, 31 December 2014 (UTC)