Talk:Naiad (moon)

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Sources generally give dual pronunciations, [NAY-ad] and [NYE-ad]. Several (US) astronomical sources give only [NAY-ud]. This is consistent with pronouncing Aitne as [ET-nee] rather than [ITE-nee]. However, there was originally a dieresis over the i, which forces the diphthong, and therefore several mythological sources (such as Robert Fagles) give only [NYE-ad]. The Oxford English Dictionary gives [NYE-ad] as the pronunciation in both the UK and US, but [NAY-ad] for the US only.

orbit decay[edit]

Since its orbit is below Neptune's synchronous orbit radius it is slowly decaying due to tidal forces

Ok, but this doesn't look very significant since it relies on the pull from tidal bulges in Neptune's atmosphere induced by Naiad itself, which are small. Than again, does anyone have any quantitative data - like how fast is the decay, or maybe just how the decay rate scales with the satellite's mass and orbital radius? Deuar 14:04, 10 June 2006 (UTC)

Gone missing[edit]

Is it possible that it has crossed the Roche limit? Lanthanum-138 (talk) 06:31, 24 July 2011 (UTC)

It's now been rediscovered: see [1]. Also, it's not very likely IMHO that it would have done so and broken apart within just the 22 years between its discovery in 1989 and my comment here. Double sharp (talk) 11:32, 19 May 2014 (UTC) (Lanthanum-138 with a new username)

Image correction[edit]

I will post this here and at Thlassa. I saw the image at NASA and contacted them, and they (Stphen Edberg) sent me an email reply with " IAU Name Discovery

III Naiad S/1989 N6 IV Thalassa S/1989 N5 V Despina S/1989 N3 "

They intend to fix it, and wen the do the image should be updated. TeigeRyan (talk) 02:33, 15 February 2015 (UTC)