Talk:Network segment

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Computing / Networking (Rated Start-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Computing, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of computers, computing, and information technology on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
Start-Class article Start  This article has been rated as Start-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by Networking task force.

Routers separate network segments?[edit]

I thought that (sub)network segments were separated by hubs and switches, and that routers separate (sub)networks. Computers on either side of a router will obviously be on a different segment, but they'll be on a different segment in a different (sub)network altogether, so it's misleading (but technically true-ish) to list routers in this article. i.e. Routers are not used to separate segments that are segments of the same (sub)network. Aaron McDaid (talk - contribs) 13:23, 7 April 2006 (UTC)

Hubs do not seprate network segment[edit]

Using a hub to interconnect devices has the same results as having the network devices on one Ethernet 10BASE2 segment. (CCNA self-study p179 Question No.1)

Two devices or many devices?[edit]

In many sentences of this article it is not clear whether "connected devices", etc. refers to exactly two devices or more than one device. The plurality of a word is incapable of making this distinction and I suspect that in some cases one meaning is intended while in other cases the other meaning is intended. It is not exactly clear where this distinction lies. I believe that this is an important distinction to make within the article. -- Sudozero (talk) 23:49, 3 August 2015 (UTC)

I tried to clarify the article a bit. Hopefully the section I changed is in line with the IEEE standard which is behind a $250+ paywall. The broader definition which equates network segments with subnets remains at the bottom of the article. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Sudozero (talkcontribs) 00:39, 4 August 2015 (UTC)