Talk:Order of the Sword (United States)

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When discussing the origins for the US Order of the Sword i think they have got it all wrong in regards to King Gustavus I of Sweden. In 1523 16 men from the Dalarna province of Sweden were designated personal guards of the king, thus creating the worlds oldest regiment still in operation, the Svea Life Guards. The royal Swedish "Order of the Sword" was created in 1748. Perhaps this creation of ordinary men into "life guards" could be seen as important?? User:Mkallgren 4 August 2010 21.18 (CEST)

Duncan McNabb Just received award http://www.amc.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123067276 Kajmal 20:41, 13 September 2007 (UTC)

Rumored ? what's rumored about it? you may not agree with the history behind the award but the current award is real and has been awareded to several people. Rumored, what kind of hack editing is that? —Preceding unsigned comment added by 216.79.206.190 (talkcontribs) 06:50, 11 June 2006

Response: Indeed it is not rumor, but a genuine honor bestowed upon officers by the enlisted force. I edited that out. Besides, if it's a rumor, why write an article?? —Preceding unsigned comment added by AlmightyDavi (talkcontribs) 21:18, 2 August 2006
Well, the article lacks any sources whatsoever, and the trustworthiness is also injured by the fact that the first version (which was probably posted by somebody in the USAF) included blatantly false claims to a historical connection to the Royal Swedish Order of the Sword. If you know more about this you are welcome to locate some references and improve the article. up+land 13:46, 10 August 2006 (UTC)


  • reworked it a bit, the receiptent list needs work and corrected the history using references. :-) 24.116.200.178 03:00, 31 August 2006 (UTC)


Well, you just re-introduced the pseudohistorical junk that I had removed. Unless you have any good references saying that this was patterned after the Swedish order and founded in the 18th century and then dormant for nearly 200 years, you should not introduce it as if it were a generally accepted historical fact. The part about Gustavus Vasa is completely irrelevant to any history of the Swedish order (which was founded 200 years after his reign), and even more so on this page. up+land 06:48, 31 August 2006 (UTC)


Look at the link for Lt Gen James. verifiable reference is there. Note that in the current verison it says "patterned after", not a decendent of... symantics maybe but the difference is HUGE.  :-)24.116.200.178 10:35, 31 August 2006 (UTC)

It verifies that somebody writing an article for the Texas National Guard Public Affairs Office believes this version of reality to be true, or just doesn't care enough to question what s/he has been told. It doesn't really verify much else (and considering the obvious bullshit about the medieval background, there is little reason to take the rest seriously). up+land 11:36, 31 August 2006 (UTC)
generally speaking, anything a Mil PA office publishes that deals with historical items is cleared through an Armed Forces Historian before printing. ~~

Just came in on this conversation. I was looking up a General who had the Order of the Sword Ceremony bestowed on him. Looking on google and found this. Noticed he wasn't listed on their info page. I know he received it because I helped host it in 1984. General Robert T. Marsh. It was very elaborate and well worth it. As a matter of fact, I had never heard of one even though I had been in the military for several years. Many others knew nothing of it also. It was a great 3 days off for me in Flordia and I'll never forget the great opportunity this allowed me. How I met him and how he remembered me was the funniest thing that ever happened to me in the military. Still, having problems finding updated info on him.