Talk:Radius

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 Field:  Geometry
One of the 500 most frequently viewed mathematics articles.

that not it[edit]

you can be doing some thing but not this;) 3(a+4)=15 3a+12=15 3a=3 a=1 —Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.37.173.133 (talk) 23:41, 29 May 2008 (UTC)


Radius of a Regular Polygon[edit]

Radius of a Regular Polygon should be added as a sub-section somewhere in this article. I'd add it myself, but I bet it would be more than likely removed for a reason that doesn't exist. 198.150.12.32 (talk) 16:21, 24 April 2008 (UTC)

Done. I also mentioned the distinction between the inradius and the circumradius. --68.0.124.33 (talk) 18:28, 2 October 2008 (UTC)

Vandalism[edit]

There's been a lot of vandalism latley. And it's been going on for two months. What should we do? Wuffyz (talk) 20:32, 14 May 2008 (UTC)

You can always request semiprotection at Wikipedia:Requests for page protection. That’s not always a pretty solution though, because then genuine edits are prevented from anonymous users as well. GromXXVII (talk) 21:40, 14 May 2008 (UTC)

I noticed that "The inradius of a regular polygon is also called apothegm." Apothegm seems to link to the wrong page. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 69.92.166.134 (talk) 05:46, 18 April 2010 (UTC)

Disambiguation[edit]

The article needs a disambiguation page so the following "Radius" also has an article under the same name.

http://www.gnu.org/software/radius/

Kernel.package (talk) 19:26, 29 March 2009 (UTC)

Radius from three points[edit]

Should there not be a diagram which shows "a circle going through three points P1, P2, P3" as to show "where θ" "the angle" is? I am sure a young person reading this would be asking themselves where the vertex is. John W. Nicholson (talk) 11:54, 2 September 2012 (UTC)