Talk:Sidearm

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Who wrote this stuff?[edit]

As to these two statements: The sidearm motion is a more natural motion of the arm and leads to a reduced risk of elbow and shoulder injuries that are common in pitchers.[citation needed] Sidearm pitching is becoming more popular in baseball, especially for relief pitchers.[citation needed]

I have always heard the opposite, and that sidearm pitching leads to injuries. Also, sidearm pitching is not "becoming more popular in baseball," as there are still only a handful of pros who pitch sidearm. Who said this stuff? By the way, here is a college coach who agrees with me: http://www.stevenellis.com/steven_ellis_the_complete/pitching_mechanics_sidearm/ —Preceding unsigned comment added by 74.109.7.33 (talk) 02:22, 2 June 2010 (UTC)

Now I've written this stuff![edit]

I have corrected, or at least improved, the discussion about sidearm, including the discussion about injuries. It is not possible just to say that sidearm is healthful or injurious to the arm. So much depends on where the arm is when the stride foot lands, not to mention the individuals' physiology. Truthfully, I think that it must be said that pitching itself predisposes pitchers to shoulder and elbow problems! But that said, proper technique, not matter the arm slot, is the pitcher's best hope for a healthy career. Joelthesecond (talk) 12:07, 5 October 2010 (UTC)

Crossfire[edit]

This article needs a segment on crossfire pitching technique or crossfire delivery which is unique to sidearm delivery. [1][2] — Preceding unsigned comment added by 94.253.138.227 (talk) 14:19, 16 January 2017 (UTC)