Talk:Teshub

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Section[edit]

The Hurrian myth of Teshub's origin—he was conceived when the god Kumarbi bit off and swallowed his father Anu's genitals—is a likely inspiration for the story of Uranus, Cronus, and Zeus, which is recounted in Hesiod's Theogony. - Isn't it possible that they both derive from a common source, rather than that the Hurrian myth inspired the other? RickK 22:00, Mar 25, 2005 (UTC)


==I will tell you very important thing about Teshub. In Kurdish Teshup means "Axe". When I look at Teshup he is holding an axe. This is how he got his name. Teshub might be etnically Kurdish. Very interesting.

The hurrian god Teshub is also the god of luwians and hittities with names Tarhun as well.


Don't tell stories you liar. Never heard that Teshup means "axe" in Kurdish. "Axe" is "bevr". I doubt you are a Kurd. 176.199.184.166 (talk) 01:00, 1 May 2015 (UTC)

Identity?[edit]

I don't know what the inscription says but the deity venerated here certainly grasps a tall sheaf of grain in his left hand and a fruiting branch of the vine in his right: bread, beer and wine are not usually attributes of a 'storm god". --Wetman (talk) 03:47, 5 June 2010 (UTC)

On the contrary, Storm Gods were often associated with agriculture...207.237.208.153 (talk) 00:10, 25 April 2013 (UTC)

Teshub is Adad[edit]

Not really. Although they were likely conflated in interactions between the Hittites and their Semitic neighbors. Tarhun ultimately derives from a Proto-Indo-European source and Adad from a Proto-Afro-Asiatic source. Two separate cultural traditions.207.237.208.153 (talk) 00:09, 25 April 2013 (UTC)

Why name the article Teshub?[edit]

I mean, why is this article named Teshub instead of Tarhun? Teshub is derived from the Hitttite Tarhun, and the Hittite version of the God (this article talks about both interchangeably) is for more significant and referenced than the Hurrian version. It seems a weird priority to place.207.237.208.153 (talk) 00:06, 25 April 2013 (UTC)


Some people need to learn more about the History of Hurrians it seems. It is a wide wide known thing that Hurrians pre date Hittites and even Hattians for at least a thousand years. It is also a well known fact that Hittites adopted "Tarhun" from the Hattian "Taru", which itself is adpoted from Hurrian "Teshub". That the term Tarh has it's roots in Hittite is just a hypothesis.

The fact that Indo European "Taranis, Zeus, Tarhun and even Thor are mythologicaly speaks for a common root.

http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/588582/Teshub

176.199.184.166 (talk) 01:06, 1 May 2015 (UTC)