Talk:The Bottle Deposit

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
WikiProject Seinfeld (Rated C-class, Mid-importance)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Seinfeld, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Seinfeld-related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the discussion and see a list of open tasks.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the quality scale.
 Mid  This article has been rated as Mid-importance on the importance scale.
 
WikiProject Television / Episode coverage (Rated C-class)
WikiProject icon This article is within the scope of WikiProject Television, a collaborative effort to develop and improve Wikipedia articles about television programs. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page where you can join the discussion. To improve this article, please refer to the style guidelines for the type of work.
C-Class article C  This article has been rated as C-Class on the project's quality scale.
 ???  This article has not yet received a rating on the project's importance scale.
Taskforce icon
This article is supported by the episode coverage task force.
 
Note icon
This article has been automatically rated by a bot or other tool because one or more other projects use this class. Please ensure the assessment is correct before removing the |auto= parameter.

Farmer's daughter situation[edit]

The article originally attributed the source of this situation to a Bob Dylan song, however it has long been in use as a somewhat dirty joke, often involving a traveling salesman taking refuge at a farm overnight. See this site for examples. I left in the possible attribution to Dylan, however, since it is unknown if the song is, in fact, the source of the situation. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Zorque (talkcontribs) 04:26, 27 June 2008 (UTC)

Michigan bottle law[edit]

Under Part 1's Trivia section, it is said that Michigan law prohibits returns in excess of $25 per visit. In reality, the law allows retailers to cap returns at any amount $25 or over per visit, although it's not mandatory. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 99.153.6.131 (talk) 23:25, 8 July 2008 (UTC)