Talk:Thirtynine Mile volcanic area

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Move to Thirtynine Mile volcanic area[edit]

I'd like to move this page to Thirtynine Mile volcanic area, as it is a part of the Central Colorado volcanic field. Quote: "The central Colorado volcanic field (CCVF) consists of at least ten late Eocene/Oligocene (38–29 Ma)eruptive centers and their volcanic products dispersed over approximately 22,000 square km in the Southern Rocky Mountains... The CCVF was severely dissected by Neogene faulting and erosion leaving widely scattered remnants, the largest of which is the Thirtynine Mile volcanic area (previously known as the Thirtynine Mile volcanic field), " (William C. McIntosh and Charles E. Chapin (2004). Geochronology of the central Colorado volcanic field. New Mexico Bureau of Geology and Mineral Resources, Bulletin 160. http://geoinfo.nmt.edu/publications/bulletins/160/downloads/10mcntsh.pdf. Retrieved 2010-03-31.)--Chris.urs-o (talk) 19:23, 2 April 2010 (UTC)