Talk:Tie (typography)

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double breve and inverted undertie[edit]

What are double breve ('o͝o') and inverted undertie ('o⁔o') used for? --moyogo (talk) 15:53, 9 November 2009 (UTC)

  • UPA and AHD. --moyogo (talk) 16:34, 9 November 2009 (UTC)

More uses[edit]

see thread http://unicode.org/mail-arch/unicode-ml/y2006-m06/0170.html

Usage in vocal music scores[edit]

I'm not sure there's a proper term for it, but the undertie seems to be used also in music scores featuring the voice. In the lyrics of a score, when two or more vowels belonging to two or more separate words, are to be sung under a single note, the undertie is used connecting thus the vowels (e.g. ma_e_a-ma-bil-le; the first four letters of the phrase would be connected by an undertie). Musicians usually refer to it as elision, but hyphen is also used (albeit easily confused with hyphens between syllables within a single word). This is a rather modern practice in music typography; older scores simply make use of spaces, which can lead to confusion when the whole thing is quite dense. I cannot seem to find a reference to the above at the moment, but it would make a good addition to the article, if someone would like to add it. --Chrysalifourfour (talk) 15:29, 26 June 2016 (UTC)


enotikon[edit]

The word enotikon seems ill defined. Maybe it's transliterated from Greek, and maybe there exists an English word for the same thing? It would be useful to know what it means so the first section in this article becomes readable. Or perhaps the word could be moved further down into the article and there also explain inline what the word means. As is, people will mistake it for emoticon and sooner or later someone might make a "spell check" correction and loose the word. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Sesammases (talkcontribs) 17:00, 22 October 2017 (UTC)