Talk:Tyneside flat

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WikiProject North East England (Rated Start-class, Low-importance)
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Comparitive upper/lower floor space?[edit]

The article states that the lower flat has less space because of intrusion by the stairway - but surely each should have as much as the other, because the stairs intrude on both? The lower can have a storage area or a lower-ceiling alcove under the upper portion of the stairs, and the upper flat can have similar (with a full height ceiling but possibly a rising floor) over the lower end. The amount of floor space in each property other than that occupied by the stairs being exactly the same.

What would be good however is a better explanation, maybe a diagram, of how the back yard, outside toilet and scullery setup works. Surely one or the other has to lose some space then because of the external stairs, unless that is also somehow arranged to disadvantage each equally (by half or all of the total)?

I've seen some arrangements with fire-escape style external metal stairs that criss-cross to reduce the total land take, but those are on taller buildings with three or more stacked flats (usually over shops, with separate entrances squeezed between each frontage, so not quite a typical apartment block) of more modern design, usually with full indoor plumbing and a single shared rear yard/garden space, that's not much of a guide here. 51.7.49.61 (talk) 18:41, 27 August 2017 (UTC)