Talk:Verdigris

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Verdigris is also the name of a Doctor Who novel written by Paul Magrs. --Travlr23 23:13, 1 Apr 2005 (UTC)

Piano[edit]

Verdigris can be found in some piano actions forming especially in the center pin-bushing cloth area. Its effects can be purely cosmetic forming a greenish waxy substance, or more severe, with the action becoming sticky causing friction in moving parts. Piano technicians can remedy this problem (sometimes only temporarily) by cleaning with and alcohol mixture or by using a centerpin lubricant. In extreme cases it may be necessary to re-pin the part after replacing the bushing cloth. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Emmery (talkcontribs) 17:06, 2 April 2008 (UTC)

patina[edit]

What's the difference between verdigris and patina? —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 209.218.206.2 (talk) 20:38, 20 February 2007 (UTC).

According to the disambiguation page, verdigris is a type of patina. — Tajik24 03:37, 20 July 2007 (UTC)
I think I am right in saying that verdigris is the green patina found on copper alloys. Other patina colours such as red, blue or black can also be achieved on copper alloys, and on other metals.Plantsurfer (talk) 17:37, 2 April 2008 (UTC)

Verdigris Cu(CH3COO)2·[Cu(OH)2]3·2H2O ) > Copper(II) acetate is formed with acid whereas patina is a mixture of alcaline copper compounds. The two are often mixed up and use isn't consistent. Verdigris is toxic. 76.97.245.5 (talk) 00:44, 8 December 2008 (UTC)

Etymology[edit]

"... it was required by artists in Greece." what is meant by this? The etymology here does not seem well explained. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 128.220.159.20 (talk) 18:53, 17 April 2012 (UTC)