Talk:Warm-glow giving

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What is the Alternative to Warm-Glow Giving?[edit]

71.173.91.253 (talk) 00:06, 28 July 2012 (UTC)

Dr. Branas-Garza's comment on this article[edit]

Dr. Branas-Garza has reviewed this Wikipedia page, and provided us with the following comments to improve its quality:


Comment 1

After paragraph 1: Warm-glow giving is an economic phenomenon (…) the positive emotional feeling people get from helping others. we could ADD: This approach is quite similar to identity models (LINK to Identity wikipage).REF1

Ref1: Akerlof, George and Kranton, Rachel, "Economics and Identity," The Quarterly Journal of Economics CVX (3), August 2000, pp. 715–753. Aguiar, Fernando, Brañas-Garza, Pablo, Espinosa, Maria Paz, and Miller, Luis (2010). “Personal Identity: a theoretical and experimental analysis” Journal of Economic Methodology 17(3): 261-275.

Comment 2

After the end of paragraph 3 “Further research has demonstrated that the reward centers of the brain activate in response to charitable giving and helping others, suggesting physiological evidence for the warm-glow phenomenon.[4]“ we could ADD: Recent studies suggests that altruistic behavior might be heritable. Ref 2

Ref2: Cesarini David, Dawes Christopher T, Johannesson Magnus, Lichtenstein Paul, Wallace Bjorn (2009). “Genetic Variation in Preferences for Giving and Risk Taking”. The Quarterly Journal of Economics 2: 809–842. Brañas-Garza Pablo, Kovářík Jaromir, Neyse Levent (2013). “Second-to-Fourth Digit Ratio Has a Non-Monotonic Impact on Altruism” PLoS ONE 8(4): e60419.

Comment 3

See also section: add Dictator Game (wikipage)


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We believe Dr. Branas-Garza has expertise on the topic of this article, since he has published relevant scholarly research:


  • Reference : Pablo Branas-Garza & Jaromir Kovarik & Levent Neyse, 2013. "Second-to-Fourth Digit Ratio has a Non-Monotonic Impact on Altruism," Working Papers 13-09, Chapman University, Economic Science Institute.

ExpertIdeasBot (talk) 19:51, 1 July 2016 (UTC)

Dr. Tonin's comment on this article[edit]

Dr. Tonin has reviewed this Wikipedia page, and provided us with the following comments to improve its quality:


It would be good to add that "warm-glow as a motive for giving has been used to explain the absence of complete crowding out of charitable donations, as would be predicted by giving motivated solely by purely altruistic motives (Andreoni and Payne, 2003).

Andreoni, James, and A. Abigail Payne. "Do government grants to private charities crowd out giving or fund-raising?." The American Economic Review 93.3 (2003): 792-812.


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We believe Dr. Tonin has expertise on the topic of this article, since he has published relevant scholarly research:


  • Reference 1: Tonin, Mirco & Vlassopoulos, Michael, 2011. "An Experimental Investigation of Intrinsic Motivations for Giving," IZA Discussion Papers 5461, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Reference 2: Tonin, Mirco & Vlassopoulos, Michael, 2013. "Sharing One's Fortune? An Experimental Study on Earned Income and Giving," IZA Discussion Papers 7294, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

ExpertIdeasBot (talk) 15:58, 24 August 2016 (UTC)

Dr. Nyborg's comment on this article[edit]

Dr. Nyborg has reviewed this Wikipedia page, and provided us with the following comments to improve its quality:


I would replace the word "egoistic" (occurs twice) by "self-oriented". There is not necessarily a conflict between being morally motivated and being concerned about one's own contribution. See Brekke, K. A., S. Kverndokk, and K. Nyborg (2003): An Economic Model of Moral Motivation, Journal of Public Economics 87 (9-10), 1967-1983.


We hope Wikipedians on this talk page can take advantage of these comments and improve the quality of the article accordingly.

We believe Dr. Nyborg has expertise on the topic of this article, since he has published relevant scholarly research:


  • Reference : Brekke, Kjell Arne & Hauge, Karen Evely & Lind, Jo Thori & Nyborg, Karine, 2009. "Playing with the Good Guys: A Public Good Game with Endogenous Group Formation," Memorandum 08/2009, Oslo University, Department of Economics.

ExpertIdeasBot (talk) 19:08, 30 August 2016 (UTC)