Talk:Women in Love (film)

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Please change[edit]

The film and book are set at the turn of the 20th Century, not the turn of the 19th. Guv2006 08:56, 14 January 2007 (UTC)

Quite right. You could have changed it, but I'll save you the effort. Cheers. JackofOz 03:49, 19 January 2007 (UTC)

I'm afraid I disagree. The English term, "Turn of the century" seems to date from around the decade of the 1920's, when it referred purely to the transition from 19th to 20th. It is thought (see Wikipedia Turn of the century) to be the English equivalent of the French, "Fin de siècle" - meaning, in this context, the end of the 19th century. This would imply that the century to which the phrase refers is the one ending, not starting.

I have made a cursory review of several dictionaries (including Wiktionary) and have failed to find any entry for the "turn of the nth century", giving any definitive pointer to the century to which the phrase refers. Since the Wikipedia article is the best source apparently available, I'm inclined to revert this alteration. No, better still, I'll rewrite it to avoid the controversy.

This is clearly an area of ambiguity in the English language which could do with a clear-cut resolution. Wikipedia is not the place to host this discussion, however. --King Hildebrand 18:03, 29 January 2007 (UTC)

degrees of tenderness[edit]

The "semi tender Gerald"? WilliamSommerwerck (talk) 11:59, 19 June 2011 (UTC)

Date of "Gothic"[edit]

I was surprised to see you quote "Gothic" as being a production of the mid-80s. I am sure I remember seeing both "Gothic" and "Women in Love" when I was a student in the 1970s. But I stand to be corrected. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Olddognewtricks (talkcontribs) 10:10, 10 July 2011 (UTC)