Talk:WordStar

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Authoring Info[edit]

Authoring info is divergent...

Dot Commands[edit]

WordStar also had several Dot Commands which were placed on the first line of a document immediately after a dot (period) as the first character in the line.

WordStar for DOS command reference http://www.wordstar.org/wsdos/kb/Q2002.htm

WordStar Emulation[edit]

I added a section about making modern software run as if it were WordStar. --Tomzc 21:58, 7 November 2007 (UTC)tomzc

Download Location[edit]

Does anybody know of a location I can download WordStar for dos or windows or both?

Windows Version Screenshot[edit]

Can anybody find a screenshot of the windows version?

Yes, I've uploaded a screenshot here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Wswin.gif#file --Tomzc 22:33, 7 November 2007 (UTC)tomzc

DisplayWrite Confusion[edit]

Both DisplayWrite and DisplayWriter is mentioned in the article. My understanding is that DisplayWrite was the application and Displaywriter (note the capitalization) was the system (the computer and the software). What exactly is DisplayWriter in the text referring to? —The preceding unsigned comment was added by Andreas Toth (talkcontribs) 02:18, 22 January 2007 (UTC).

Abandonware, Surely?[edit]

The article emphatically says Wordstar is not abandonware, but abandonware is defined as software that is no longer purchasable and is outdate (in some unspecified way). Given that you can't purchase Wordstar from the copyright holder, and you apparently can't purchase it from any resellers (according to the user's group site) except maybe one Indian vendor that sells sometimes-corrupted floppies, I'd say it is definitively abandonware.rcousine (talk) 20:13, 29 November 2007 (UTC)

ahead or behind?[edit]

The article says "led to the former product being scrapped and the latter product released years ahead of its originally scheduled launch date". It was released years ahead of the scheduled date, or behind? Usually when there are problems, the software is late, not early. Bubba73 (talk), 06:22, 15 December 2007 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:Ws7 xp.PNG[edit]

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BetacommandBot (talk) 14:35, 21 January 2008 (UTC)

Fair use rationale for Image:Wsico.PNG[edit]

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Image:Wsico.PNG is being used on this article. I notice the image page specifies that the image is being used under fair use but there is no explanation or rationale as to why its use in this Wikipedia article constitutes fair use. In addition to the boilerplate fair use template, you must also write out on the image description page a specific explanation or rationale for why using this image in each article is consistent with fair use.

Please go to the image description page and edit it to include a fair use rationale. Using one of the templates at Wikipedia:Fair use rationale guideline is an easy way to insure that your image is in compliance with Wikipedia policy, but remember that you must complete the template. Do not simply insert a blank template on an image page.

If there is other fair use media, consider checking that you have specified the fair use rationale on the other images used on this page. Note that any fair use images lacking such an explanation can be deleted one week after being tagged, as described on criteria for speedy deletion. If you have any questions please ask them at the Media copyright questions page. Thank you.

BetacommandBot (talk) 15:06, 21 January 2008 (UTC)

The first version[edit]

I read somewhere years ago that Rob Barnaby wrote the whole thing himself in 4 months, in Z-80 assembly language. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Bizzybody (talkcontribs) 06:47, 7 September 2008 (UTC)

Marking a Block; Function Keys[edit]

"WordStar 2000 was also rare among word processing programs in that it permitted the user to mark (highlight) a block of text (with ^BB for Block Begin and ^BE for Block End) and leave it marked in place, and then go to a different section and copy it (with ^BC for Block Copy)."

"Regular" WordStar used the same method from the very beginning, although with different commands (^KB for block begin and ^KK for block end). Version 7.0 added the capability of marking two blocks, one at a time.

A common misunderstanding seems to be that WordStar did not utilize the function keys. In fact, from version 4.0 onwards, all function keys were used alone and with Alt, Shift and Ctrl keys, making a total of 40 key functions available just as in WordPerfect and Microsoft Word. An added bonus was that each function key could be reprogrammed by using the WSCHANGE program, also used for modifying screen colours, page settings etc.

Pardon my English; it's a foreign language. Harjasusi (talk) 07:06, 6 April 2009 (UTC)

Apple Computer Version[edit]

Apple computer is not mentioned in this article and at least should be given a nod. Wordstar's popularity reached it's height in part because of the availability of a cp/m 3rd party bus mastering card which contained a Zilog Z-80 processor. Together with a shift key modification, that card gave the Apple II the ability to run Wordstar on a "hi res" monochrome monitor. I know many, many people ran WS on their Apple II's. — Preceding unsigned comment added by N0w8st8s (talkcontribs) 16:28, 17 April 2011 (UTC)

Wordstar on Linux[edit]

There's a very capable Wordstar clone that runs under Linux called "jstar", it's a UI for a more general modeless text editor called joe. Joe is an acronym for Joe's Own Editor. I've only ever used the jstar personality of joe, but I can't recommend it enough to anyone who wishes to keep using WS. There is a Wikipedia page for Joe. I would like to see it at least referenced in this article. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Chasetruck (talkcontribs) 14:52, 29 July 2011 (UTC)

it is, and was when you wrote this — Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.89.139.58 (talk) 20:31, 28 September 2012 (UTC)

File:Wordstar.gif Nominated for speedy Deletion[edit]

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An image used in this article, File:Wordstar.gif, has been nominated for speedy deletion for the following reason: Wikipedia files with no non-free use rationale as of 24 May 2012

What should I do?

Don't panic; you should have time to contest the deletion (although please review deletion guidelines before doing so). The best way to contest this form of deletion is by posting on the image talk page.

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This is Bot placed notification, another user has nominated/tagged the image --CommonsNotificationBot (talk) 12:27, 24 May 2012 (UTC)

WS 4.0 and directories[edit]

“By that point, MicroPro had dropped the generic MS-DOS WordStar and version 4.0 was exclusively for IBM compatibles. However, it continued to use the old DOS 1.x OS calls, which did not support directories and limited its usability on machines with hard disks.”

Somebody has got things very wrong. Up to version 3.4 (the first that could handle all 256 ASCII characters and therefore translated to several languages including Finnish) WS was unable to handle directories, but version 4.0 was completely redesigned and did indeed include directory support. On the other hand, 4.0 was available for CP/M computers too.

“There were also WordStar 5, 5.5, 6, and 7.”

And that’s all that there was to it …? Oh, c’mon! Somebody ought to write a more complete review; I’m just afraid I can’t do it myself. Or should I try? Harjasusi (talk) 07:23, 2 April 2014 (UTC)

WordStar wasn't the first word processor with WYSIWYG[edit]

I question the following statement in the article: From Section 1.2 Early Success: "WordStar was the first microcomputer word processor to offer mail merge and WYSIWYG."

But WYSIWYG#History says: "Bravo, a document preparation program for the Alto produced at Xerox PARC by Butler Lampson, Charles Simonyi and colleagues in 1974, is generally considered the first program to incorporate WYSIWYG technology, displaying text with formatting (e.g. with justification, fonts, and proportional spacing of characters). "

From the Features section, it looks like Wordstar didn't get WYSIWYG until WordStar 5: "WordStar 5 introduced a document-mode "print preview" feature, allowing the user to inspect a WYSIWYG version of text, complete with inserted graphics, as it would appear on the printed page." Frappyjohn (talk) 02:13, 6 April 2015 (UTC)

Bravo only ran on the Xerox Alto, which was never sold commercially, so software written for it cannot be said to offer or have introduced anything.

Re: Keyboard shortcuts[edit]

I'm not a citation, but I am a witness. At the product launch for Wordstar 2000 at Comdex in Las Vegas, a company representative lamented that customers could not see past the Wordstar brand to see that Wordstar 2000 was an entirely new product with a new interface. She demonstrated the Ctrl-B, Ctrl-U, and Ctrl-I commands, which were not standard at the time. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Toweyb (talkcontribs) 18:44, 24 October 2015 (UTC)