Tamicha Jackson

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Tamicha Jackson
Personal information
Born (1978-04-22) April 22, 1978 (age 39)
Dallas, Texas
Nationality American
Listed height 5 ft 6 in (1.68 m)
Listed weight 116 lb (53 kg)
Career information
High school Lincoln (Dallas, Texas)
College Louisiana Tech (1996–2000)
WNBA draft 2000 / Round: 1 / Pick: 8th overall
Selected by the Detroit Shock
Playing career 2000–2006
Position Point guard
Number 35
Career history
2000 Detroit Shock
2001–2002 Portland Fire
2003 Phoenix Mercury
2004–2005 Washington Mystics
2006 Phoenix Mercury
Stats at WNBA.com

Tamicha Renia Jackson (born April 22, 1978) is an American former women's basketball player. She earned a gold medal with the US Junior World Championship team (1996–97). She was named Kodak All-American for the Lady Techsters in 2000. Tamicha graduated from Louisiana Tech University in 2000 with a degree in Animal Biology.

USA Basketball[edit]

Jackson was named to the USA Basketball Women's Junior National Team when it was invited to the 1997 FIBA Junior World Championship (now called U19) held in Natal, Brazil. After beating Japan, the next game was against Australia, the defending champion. The USA team pulled out to a 13 point lead in the second half, but gave up the lead and lost the game 80–74. The USA rebounded with a close 92–88 victory over Cuba, helped by 23 points each from Maylana Martin and Lynn Pride. The USA then went on to beat previously unbeaten Russia. After winning the next two games, the USA faced Australia in the gold medal game. The USA team has a three point lead late, but the Aussies hit a three-pointer with three seconds left in regulation to force overtime. Although the Aussies scored first, the USA team came back, then pulled into the lead and held on to win 78–74 to earn the gold, and the first medal for a USA team at a Junior World Championship. Jackson averaged 3.0 points per game.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Fourth FIBA Women's U19/Junior World Championship -- 1997". USA Basketball. January 20, 2011. Archived from the original on 7 September 2015. Retrieved 20 October 2015. 

External links[edit]