Target lesion

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

In dermatology, a target lesion or bull's-eye lesion, named for its resemblance to the bull's-eye of a shooting target, is the typical lesion of erythema multiforme (EM) in which a vesicle is surrounded by an often hemorrhagic maculopapule; EM is often self-limited, of acute onset, resolves in three to six weeks, and has a cyclical pattern; EM lesions are multiform (polymorphous) and include macules, papules, vesicles, and bullae. Target lesions are also typical of erythema chronicum migrans.

Etiology[edit]

Such lesions may be idiopathic or may follow infections, drug therapy, or immunodeficiency.

Morphology[edit]

Target lesion consists of three zones :

  1. Dark centre of small papule, vesicle, or bulla (iris)
  2. Pale intermediate zone
  3. Peripheral rim of erythema

References[edit]

the free dictionary : medical dictionary [1]