Teacher's Beau

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Teacher's Beau
Teachers beau.JPEG
Directed by Gus Meins
Produced by Hal Roach
Starring George McFarland
Carl Switzer
Scotty Beckett
Billie Thomas
Matthew Beard
Music by Leroy Shield
Cinematography Art Lloyd
Edited by Robert O. Crandall
Distributed by MGM
Release date
  • April 27, 1935 (1935-04-27)
Running time
18' 48"
Country United States
Language English

Teacher's Beau is a 1935 Our Gang short comedy film directed by Gus Meins. It was the 136th Our Gang short (48th talking episode) that was released.

Plot[edit]

On the last day of school, the gang learns that their beloved teacher Miss Jones is going to be married and that, come September, they will have a new teacher named Mrs. Wilson. Miss Jones's fiancé, Ralph, playfully paints a frightening picture of Mrs. Wilson as "a dried-up mean old woman," neglecting to inform the kids that his last name is Wilson and that Miss Jones will continue to be their teacher under her new, married name.

Thanks to Ralph's ill-timed joshing, the youngsters convince themselves that the only way to retain their favorite teacher is to break up the wedding, starting with the prenuptial reception, where the kids surreptitiously spike the food by emptying the salt and pepper shakers into it and full bottles of tabasco sauce and horseradish. After they do this, they discover that "Mrs. Wilson" is actually Miss Jones, that she got special permission to keep her job, and that Ralph, whose surname is Wilson, will allow her to teach them as long as she likes. Unfortunately, the gang has to force themselves into eating the ultra-spicy spaghetti to save face. They all rush to the water spigot as soon as they are excused from the table.[1]

Other notes[edit]

  • Teacher's Beau marks the final appearance of series stalwart Matthew "Stymie" Beard and Jannie Hoskins. At one time the star of the series, Beard was reduced to a single line of dialogue in Teacher's Beau. Jannie was in our gang since the silent Era. Dorothy Dandridge appears in this film.[2]
  • The version included in the "Little Rascals" TV package had been severely edited back in 1971 for various reasons. It continued airing on AMC from 2001 to 2003 in its edited form, unlike other episodes. A complete and uncut version was available on VHS home video in the 1980s and 1990s. Like the other 79 talking Hal Roach-produced Our Gang episodes, this one was released on DVD as of October 28, 2008.
  • The rendition of Old MacDonald Had a Farm was sung by the Cabin Kids.[3] When they return to their seats, two members of the quintet were replaced by stand-ins, Dorothy Dandridge and Jannie Hoskins, a little sister of Allen Hoskins, who played Farina from 1922 to 1931.
  • The song Alfalfa sings, with his brother Harold accompanying on mandolin, is Ticklish Reuben.

Cast[edit]

Additional cast[edit]

  • Harold Switzer as Harold
  • The Cabin Kids as Themselves
  • Dorothy Dandridge as Cabin Kid (stand-in)
  • Jannie Hoskins as Cabin Kid (stand-in)
  • Billy Bletcher as Chairman Of The Board
  • Arletta Duncan as Miss Jones
  • Gus Leonard as Old man
  • Robert McKenzie as Laughing guest
  • Edward Norris as Ralph Wilson
  • Barry Downing as Classroom extra
  • Marianne Edwards as Classroom extra
  • Dorian Johnston as Classroom extra
  • Margaret Kerry as Classroom extra
  • Tommy McFarland as Classroom extra
  • Donald Proffitt as Classroom extra
  • Jackie White as Classroom extra
  • Ernie Alexander as Guest
  • Bobby Burns as Guest
  • Charlie Hall as Guest
  • Fred Holmes as Guest
  • Lon Poff as Guest
  • Beverley Baldey as Undetermined role
  • Jamie Kauffman as Undetermined role
  • Snooky Valentine as Undermined role

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "New York Times: Teacher's Beau". NY Times. Retrieved 2008-09-20. 
  2. ^ Maltin, Leonard and Bann, Richard W. (1977, rev. 1992). The Little Rascals: The Life and Times of Our Gang, pp. 155-156. New York: Crown Publishing/Three Rivers Press. ISBN 0-517-58325-9
  3. ^ "Cabin Kids - Their Rise and Fall". Retrieved 2017-03-13. 

External links[edit]