Video production

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A video editor operating an AVID video software editing system in an editing suite

Video production is the process of creating video by capturing moving images (videography), and creating combinations and reductions of parts of this video in live production and post-production (video editing). In most cases the captured video will be recorded on the most current electronic media such as SD cards. In the past footage was captured on video tape, hard disk, or solid state storage. Video tape capture is now obsolete and solid state storage is reserved for just that, storage. It is now distributed digitally in formats such as the Moving Picture Experts Group format (.mpeg, .mpg, .m4p), QuickTime (.mov), Audio Video Interleave (.avi), Windows Media Video (.wmv), and DivX (.avi, .divx). It is the equivalent of filmmaking, but with images recorded digitally instead of on film stock.

Overview[edit]

Practically, video production is the art and service of creating content and delivering a finished video product. This can include production of television programs, television commercials, corporate videos, event videos, wedding videos and special-interest home videos. A video production can range in size. Examples include:

Shooting styles and techniques include:

A Steadicam Operator Videotapes Trials Rider in Athens, Greece, 1994

Corporate video[edit]

Main article: Corporate video

Corporate video production covers a wide range of purposes from corporate Communication, Training and Education, videotaping conferences and conventions, products and services, and sales. A popular type of corporate shoot is known as the "candids" or "happy-face" video, in which a multiple-day event is covered by a video crew, including speakers, break-out sessions, awards ceremonies and local recreational activities in which the conventioneers participate. An on-site editor then creates a short video presentation that is shown before the close of the convention. Many associations take advantage of the convention venue to gather interviews of their principals, setting up a green screen or other type of background in a secluded room.

Video productions video tape or memory-based recording device or an edited version from a website video, optical disc, magnetic tape, or portable video device.

Television broadcast[edit]

Main article: Broadcast
Video Production of a Political Commercial, San Diego, California, 2004

Betacam SP video production was the broadcast television standard from the early 1980s up until the beginning of the 21st Century when many television stations began using digital media to shoot, transmit and store High-definition (HD) footage. Two styles of producing video are ENG - Electronic news-gathering and EFP - Electronic field production. Television broadcast productions include television commercials, infomercials, newscasts, entertainment shows, documentaries, news magazines, sitcom and reality shows. They may be distributed by broadcast syndication.

Event video[edit]

Main article: Event videography

Video production can be used at sporting, school, stage, wedding, church, and similar events to provide recordings of the events. Event video productions range in distribution from a wedding video that is custom made for a bride and groom and their immediate family and friends, to a dance recital where dozens to hundreds of videos are sold to individual dancers. Event video production can also be used to broadcast events live to viewers at home such as a press conference or concert. Video of live events can be sent by microwave or a satellite truck from the event location to a television studio in order to be broadcast.[2]

Video production for distance education[edit]

Video production for distance education is the process of capturing, editing, and presenting educational material specifically for use in on-line education. Teachers integrate best practice teaching techniques to create scripts, organize content, capture video footage, edit footage using computer based video editing software to deliver final educational material over the Internet. It differs from other types of video production in three ways: 1. It augments traditional teaching tools used in on-line educational programs. 2. It may incorporate motion video with sound, computer animations, stills, and other digital media. 3. Capture of content may include use of cell phone integrated cameras and extend to commercial high-definition Broadcast quality cameras. The primary purpose of using video in distance education is to improve understanding and comprehension in a synchronous or asynchronous manner.[3]

Webcasting is also being used in education for distance learning projects; one innovative use was the DiveLive[4] programs. Detailing an exploration of a notable shipwreck, Nautilus Productions has a webpage reading,

In the fall of 2000 Rick Allen's Nautilus Productions co-produced with Bill Lovin of Marine Grafics a groundbreaking, week long live internet broadcast known as QAR DiveLive from the Blackbeard wreck site.[5] For the first time ever, live video and audio was broadcast from an underwater archaeological site to the World Wide Web. Students were able to watch the underwater archaeology in real time and ask questions of the scientists exploring the shipwreck. The twice-daily live distance learning programs reached an estimated 1600 students from as far away as Canada during the five days of broadcasting. In October of 2001 Allen and Lovin again co-produced QAR DiveLive 2001. This time the interactive webcasts from the seafloor and conservation laboratories of the Queen Anne's Revenge Shipwreck Project reached over 3600 students and another 2700 remote viewers from fifteen states and 2 countries during the five days of broadcasts.

Internet video production[edit]

A marketing video for the Wikimedia Foundation

Many websites include videos. These videos are not necessarily produced online, although there are many video production tools that allow the production of videos without actually using a physical camera. An example of this is using the YouTube video editor to create a video using pre-existing video content that is held on the platform under Creative Commons license.

Video content is being used in an ever growing range of contexts on websites. There are testimonial videos, web presenter videos, help section videos, interviews, parodies, product demonstrations, training videos, thank you videos and apology videos.

Many internet marketing videos are made in home based environments, however businesses too can use internet videos for the purpose of interacting with the audience. There are two main types of internet marketing videos: transactional videos, aiming to sell a product to a customer, and reference videos, aiming to keep the customer on the website.[citation needed]

Individual internet marketing videos are primarily produced in-house and by small media agencies, while a large volume of videos are produced by big media companies, crowdsourced production marketplaces or in scalable video production platforms. Most types of internet marketing videos serve the purpose of interacting with the audience, and there are two main types of internet marketing videos: transactional videos, aiming to sell a product to a customer, and reference videos, aiming to keep the customer on the website.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on March 24, 2011. Retrieved March 23, 2011. 
  2. ^ Zettl, Herbert. Video Basics 6. Belmont: Wadsworth Publishing, 2009.
  3. ^ Moore, M. G., & Kearsley, M. G. (2012). 'Distance education: A systems view of on line learning'. (3rd ed.). Belmont, CA: Wadsworth/Cengage Learning.
  4. ^ "Live from Morehead City, it's Queen Anne's Revenge". ncdcr.gov. 
  5. ^ "Queen Anne's Revenge". Nautilus Productions. 

External links[edit]