That's What Friends Are For (Johnny Mathis and Deniece Williams album)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
That's What Friends Are For
Deniece Williams - That's What Friends Are For2.jpg
Studio album by Johnny Mathis and Deniece Williams
Released July 1978[1]
Recorded April 20, 1978
April 26, 1978
April 28, 1978
May 5, 1978
May 12, 1978[1]
Studio A&M Recording Studios,
Hollywood, California[2]
Genre R&B, Soul
Length 32:30
Label Columbia/Legacy
Producer Jack Gold
Johnny Mathis chronology
You Light Up My Life
(1978)
That's What Friends Are For
(1978)
The Best Days of My Life
(1979)
Deniece Williams chronology
Song Bird
(1977)
That's What Friends Are For
(1978)
When Love Comes Calling
(1979)
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
Allmusic 3/5 stars[3]
Billboard positive[4]

That's What Friends Are For is an album by American singers Johnny Mathis and Deniece Williams that was released in July 1978 by Columbia Records. The project was a continuation of the pairing of the artists that began on his previous LP, You Light Up My Life, which included "Too Much, Too Little, Too Late", the duet that was on its way to number one on three different charts in Billboard magazine as the recording sessions for this album got underway.

On July 20, 1978, That's What Friends Are For received Gold certification from the Recording Industry Association of America for sales of 500,000 copies in the United States,[5] and it debuted on Billboard's list of America's Top LP's & Tapes shortly thereafter, in the issue dated July 29, for the start of a 16-week chart run that took the album to number 19.[6] That same issue also marked its debut on the magazine's Black Albums chart, where it remained for 11 weeks and peaked at number 14.[7] The following month, on August 28, it made its first of 11 weekly appearances on the UK album chart, during which time it got as high as number 16,[8] and October 31 of that year the British Phonographic Industry awarded the album with Gold certification for sales of 100,000 copies in the UK.[9]

The album was first released on CD in 1997 and reissued on July 1, 2003, with four additional songs by the duo, including a previously unreleased version of "Without Us", the theme from the television series Family Ties.[10]

Singles[edit]

Following quickly on the heels of the June 3, 1978, issue of Billboard in which "Too Much, Too Little, Too Late" enjoyed its week at number one on the magazine's Hot 100, this album's opener, a cover of Marvin Gaye and Tammi Terrell's "You're All I Need To Get By", was released on June 15[1] and had a July 8 debut on the magazine's list of the 100 most popular R&B singles in the US, where it peaked at number 10 over the course of 12 weeks.[11] The July 8 issue also marked its first appearance on the magazine's list of the 50 most popular Easy Listening records in the US, where it spent 11 weeks and got as high as number 16.[12] The July 29 issue included the debut of the song on the Hot 100, where it stayed for eight weeks and reached number 47.[13] The duet also became a new entry on the July 29 UK singles chart, where it made it to number 45 during a six-week run.[14]

The title song from the album (not to be confused with the Bacharach/Sager composition later popularized by Dionne Warwick) was released as a single in the fall of 1978[15] but did not have any chart appearances.

Reception[edit]

Ron Wynn of Allmusic stated that Mathis and Williams "made a fine team on this collection of sentimental love songs and light pop ballads."[3]

The review of the album in Billboard concurred, "For the most part this is a set of slick, pretty R&B pop duets, marked by Mathis' best, most uninhibited singing to date, and the equally important participation of Williams."[4]

The magazine's reviews of the singles were also positive. Regarding their cover of the Gaye/Terrell hit, they wrote, "The version here brings fresh spirit to the Ashford & Simpson number within a nicely crafted Jack Gold production."[16] And of "That's What Friends Are For" the review read, "The song has a perky arrangement but it's the Mathis/Williams vocal interplay that shines."[15]

Track listing[edit]

Side one[edit]

  1. "You're All I Need to Get By" (Nickolas Ashford, Valerie Simpson) – 2:40
  2. "Until You Come Back to Me (That's What I'm Gonna Do)" (Morris Broadnax, Clarence Paul, Stevie Wonder) – 3:39
  3. "You're a Special Part of My Life" (Lani Groves, Clarence McDonald, J.D. Williams) – 2:56
  4. "Ready or Not" (Amber DiLena, Jack Keller) – 2:50
  5. "Me for You, You for Me" (Fritz Baskett, Clarence McDonald) – 3:12

Side two[edit]

  1. "Heaven Must Have Sent You" (Lamont Dozier, Eddie Holland, Brian Holland) – 3:22
  2. "Just the Way You Are" (Billy Joel) – 3:43
  3. "That's What Friends Are For" (Fritz Baskett, Lani Groves, Clarence McDonald, Deniece Williams) – 3:27
  4. "I Just Can't Get Over You" (Nat Kipner, Winston Sela) – 4:11
  5. "Touching Me With Love" (Mel Besher, Corey Maass) – 2:30

2003 CD Bonus Tracks[edit]

  1. "Emotion" (Barry Gibb, Robin Gibb) – 3:18
  2. "Too Much, Too Little, Too Late" (Nat Kipner, John Vallins) – 3:00
  3. "Love Won't Let Me Wait" (Vinnie Barrett, Bobby Eli) – 4:16
  4. "Without Us" (Jeff Barry, Tom Scott) – 4:02

Recording dates[edit]

  • April 20, 1978 – "You're a Special Part of My Life", "Ready or Not", "Me for You, You for Me", "I Just Can't Get Over You"[1]
  • April 26, 1978 – "That's What Friends Are For"
  • April 28, 1978 – "Heaven Must Have Sent You"
  • May 5, 1978 – "You're All I Need to Get By", "Just the Way You Are", "Touching Me with Love"
  • May 12, 1978 – "Until You Come Back to Me (That's What I'm Gonna Do)"

2003 CD Bonus Tracks[edit]

  • December 20, 1977 – "Emotion"
  • January 1978 – "Too Much, Too Little, Too Late"
  • October 21, 1982 – "Without Us"
  • August 16, 1983 – "Love Won't Let Me Wait"

Personnel[edit]

Original album[edit]

Musicians[edit]

  • Murray Adler – violin[2]
  • Dorothy Ashby – harp
  • Michael Baird – drums
  • Israel Baker – violin
  • Arnold Belnick – violin
  • Harry Bluestone – concertmaster
  • Ronald Cooper – cello
  • Paulinho da Costa – percussion
  • Rollice Dale – viola
  • Douglas Davis – cello
  • Vincent DeRosa – French horn
  • Glen Dicterow – violin
  • Kurt Dieterle – violin
  • Assa Drori – violin
  • David Allan Duke – French horn
  • Scott Edwards – bass
  • Jesse Ehrlich – cello
  • Alan Estes – percussion
  • Henry Ferber – violin
  • Ronald Folsom – violin
  • David Frisina – violin
  • Jim Gilstrap – background vocals
  • Endre Granat – violin
  • Bill Green – flute, baritone saxophone
  • Ed Greene – drums
  • Lani Groves – background vocals
  • Allan Harshman – viola
  • John Heitmann – flute
  • Robert Henderson – French horn
  • William Hymanson – violin
  • Plas Johnson – flute; flute solo ("I Just Can't Get Over You")
  • Armand Kaproff – cello
  • Dennis Karmazyn – cello
  • Ray Kelley – cello
  • Myra Kestenbaum – viola
  • Jacob Krachmalnick – violin
  • Raphael Kramer – cello
  • Ron Leonard – cello
  • Steve Lukather – guitar
  • Arthur Maebe – French horn
  • Virginia Majewski – viola
  • Leonard Malarsky – violin
  • Johnny Mathis – vocals
  • Tim May – guitar
  • Alexander Neiman – viola
  • Gareth "Garry" Nuttycombe – viola
  • Don Palmer – violin
  • Richard Perissi – French horn
  • Greg Phillinganes – keyboards
  • Stanley Plummer – violin
  • George Price – French horn
  • Lee Ritenour – guitar
  • Sylvester Rivers – keyboards
  • Nathan Ross – violin
  • Henry Roth – violin
  • Michel Rubini – piano
  • Sheldon Sanov – violin
  • Harry Schultz – cello
  • David Schwartz – viola
  • Gene Sherry – French horn
  • Jack Shulman – violin
  • Henry Sigismonti – French horn
  • Ralph Silverman – violin
  • Leland Sklar – bass
  • Marshall Sosson – violin
  • Sheridon Stokes – flute
  • Gloria Strassner – cello
  • Alexander Treger – violin
  • Tommy Vig – percussion
  • David T. Walker – guitar
  • Wah Wah Ragin – guitar
  • Ernie Watts – tenor saxophone
  • Maxine Willard Waters – background vocals
  • Deniece Williams – vocals
  • Stevie Wonder – harmonica solo ("Just the Way You Are")
  • Robert Zimmitti – percussion

Production[edit]

  • Jack Gold – producer
  • Gene Page – arranger, conductor (except where noted)
  • Glen Spreen – arranger, conductor ("That's What Friends Are For")
  • Dick Bogert – recording engineer
  • Joe Gastwirt – digital remastering
  • Tom Perry – mix engineer, mastering engineer
  • Sam Emerson – photography

2003 CD reissue[edit]

Bonus tracks[1]

  • Jack Gold – producer (except where noted)
  • Denny Diante – producer ("Love Won't Let Me Wait")
  • Gene Page – arranger, conductor (except where noted)
  • Michel Colombier – arranger; conductor ("Love Won't Let Me Wait")

Reissue credits

  • Didier C. Deutsch – producer
  • Joseph M. Palmaccio – mastering engineer
  • Steve Berkowitz – Legacy A&R
  • Joy Gilbert Monfried – product manager
  • Darren Salmieri – A&R coordination
  • Howard Fritzson – art direction
  • Risa Noah – design
  • Sam Emerson – photography
  • Art Maillet/Sony Music Archives – photography
  • Linda Chang – packaging manager
  • Stacey Boyle – tape research
  • Matt Kelly – tape research
  • Ellis Widner – liner notes
  • Mastered at Sony Music Studios, New York

Charts[edit]

Album
Year Chart Position Country
1978 Black Albums 14 US
1978 Pop Albums 19 US
1978 UK Albums 16 UK
Singles
Year Single Chart Position Country
1978 "You're All I Need To Get By" Black Singles 10 US
1978 "You're All I Need To Get By" Pop Singles 47 US
1978 "You're All I Need To Get By" UK Singles 45 UK

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e (2003) That's What Friends Are For [Columbia/Legacy] by Johnny Mathis and Deniece Williams [CD booklet]. New York: Sony Music Entertainment CK 85655.
  2. ^ a b (1978) That's What Friends Are For by Johnny Mathis and Deniece Williams [album jacket]. New York: Columbia Records JC 35435.
  3. ^ a b Allmusic review
  4. ^ a b "Top Album Picks". Billboard. 1978-07-22. p. 94. 
  5. ^ "Gold & Platinum". riaa.com. Retrieved 15 January 2017.  Type Johnny Mathis in the Search box and press Enter.
  6. ^ Whitburn 2010, p. 504.
  7. ^ Whitburn 2000, p. 132.
  8. ^ "Johnny Mathis – Albums". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 16 September 2015. 
  9. ^ "BPI search results". British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved 16 September 2015. 
  10. ^ "That's What Friends Are For [Bonus Tracks] – Johnny Mathis, Deniece Williams – Release Info". allmusic.com. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 18 September 2015. 
  11. ^ Whitburn 2004, p. 383.
  12. ^ Whitburn 2007, p. 179.
  13. ^ Whitburn 2009, p. 628.
  14. ^ "Johnny Mathis – Singles". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 19 September 2015. 
  15. ^ a b "Top Single Picks". Billboard. 1978-09-30. p. 90. 
  16. ^ "Top Single Picks". Billboard. 1978-07-01. p. 92. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Whitburn, Joel (2000), Joel Whitburn's Top R&B Albums, 1965-1998, Record Research Inc., ISBN 0898201349 
  • Whitburn, Joel (2004), Joel Whitburn Presents Top R&B/Hip-Hop Singles, 1942-2004, Record Research Inc., ISBN 0898201608 
  • Whitburn, Joel (2007), Joel Whitburn Presents Billboard Top Adult Songs, 1961-2006, Record Research Inc., ISBN 0898201691 
  • Whitburn, Joel (2009), Joel Whitburn's Top Pop Singles, 1955-2008, Record Research Inc., ISBN 0898201802 
  • Whitburn, Joel (2010), Joel Whitburn Presents Top Pop Albums, Seventh Edition, Record Research Inc., ISBN 0-89820-183-7