The Boy and the Bridge

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The Boy and the Bridge is a 1959 British drama film produced and directed by Kevin McClory. It featured Ian Maclaine, Liam Redmond, James Hayter, Geoffrey Keen and Arthur Lowe. The film was actually made during the summer of 1958 and filmed and set around London's Tower Bridge from which the film takes its name. Photographed by Ted Scaife. Music Composed and Conducted by Malcolm Arnold. Screenplay by Geoffrey Orme; Kevin McClory and Desmond O'Donovan, based on a story by Leon Ware. Associate Producer David Eady.

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Believing his widowed father, Pat Doyle (Liam Redmond) to have killed a man and that the police, having arrested him, will soon come to put him in a children’s home, Tommy Doyle (Ian MacLaine), a little cockney boy, runs away from his Bermondsey lodgings and seeks sanctuary within the confines of his dream castle, Tower Bridge. He makes his home in a room at the top of the north tower, coming and going without being seen and, bit by bit, furnishing it with all the ingenuity of a nine year old boy. Here, he makes one friend, a seagull he names Sammy. To the boy, the bridge is a living character with a personality of its own and the catwalks, staircases, engine rooms and bascule chambers are a magic world in which he is king. Although he takes care not to be seen, the maintenance staff become aware of a strange “presence” and their fears are confirmed when one night, Tommy saves the life of a suicidal woman who is about to jump off the bridge into the river. "DON'T", he yells down to her, "DON'T JUMP OFF MY BRIDGE!" The woman is so startled by this voice from somewhere up there, that she changes her mind, believing the voice to be of a supernatural origin. The next day, the newspapers follow up with the story that a protective spirit presides over the bridge. Searching ceaselessly for his son, his father is suddenly confronted by Tommy on the bridge. Following the boy to the top of the tower, he realises that the building has become father, mother and home to the boy, all the things that he should have been. He explains to Tommy that the bridge was built to bring people together and has brought them together too and, as Sammy flies away to join his own kind, Tommy agrees to come home.

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