The Five Foundation

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The Five Foundation is an organisation working towards the elimination of the practice of female genital mutilation (FGM).[1] It was founded by Nimco Ali and Brendan Wynne.[2][3] It was launched in September 2019[4] in New York and currently has signed-up partners which include Plan International, Action Aid, The ONE Campaign, Save The Children (UK), UN Women (UK) and Women for Women International.[5]

In 2019, The Five Foundation advocated to have FGM included in the UK Children's Act.[6][7] The Foundation has also been active in raising awareness of a case of a Kenyan doctor's attempts to legalise FGM,[8] persuading Sudan to ban FGM in May 2020,[9][10][failed verification] working on a fatwa banning child marriage in June 2019,[11] communicating how the Covid-19 pandemic has increased the risk of FGM,[12] and being a central player in getting the US Stop FGM Act passed in January 2021.[13]

The Five Foundation also advocates for increased funding for grassroots African women's organisations[14] and on the need to end the medicalisation of FGM.[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Vernon, Polly. "Grazia Magazine". Grazia. Archived from the original on 2020-07-30. Retrieved 2020-07-29.
  2. ^ "5 Ways To Support International Day Of The Girl From Your Own Home". Bustle. Archived from the original on 2019-12-04. Retrieved 2019-12-04.
  3. ^ "Meet the young people fighting to change the world". Evening Standard. 2019-10-02. Archived from the original on 2019-10-27. Retrieved 2019-12-04.
  4. ^ "Anti FGM Campaigner Nimco Ali Launches Global Bid To Protect Girls". Reuters. 2019-09-25. Archived from the original on 2019-10-22. Retrieved 2019-10-22.
  5. ^ "Global Partnership To End Female Genital Mutilation Launches in NYC". Women For Women International. 2019-09-25. Archived from the original on 2020-10-31. Retrieved 2020-04-14.
  6. ^ Neilson, Susie (11 June 2019). "The Queen Honors Two Women Who Seek To End Female Genital Mutilation". NPR.org. Archived from the original on 2019-12-04. Retrieved 2019-12-04.
  7. ^ "The UK's FGM Bill Has Nearly Been Made Law". British Vogue. 12 March 2019. Archived from the original on 2019-12-04. Retrieved 2019-12-04.
  8. ^ "A Kenyan doctor is seeking to legalize female genital mutilation". CNN. 25 October 2019. Archived from the original on 2019-12-04. Retrieved 2019-12-04.
  9. ^ Magdy, Samy. "Sudan's bid to ban genital mutilation sparks hope, caution". Washington Post. Archived from the original on 2020-07-29. Retrieved 2020-07-29.
  10. ^ Walsh, Declan (2020-04-30). "In a Victory for Women in Sudan, Female Genital Mutilation Is Outlawed". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on 2020-05-17. Retrieved 2020-07-29.
  11. ^ Neilson, Susie (26 June 2019). "How A Former Child Bride Got A Fatwa Against Child Marriage". NPR.org. Archived from the original on 2019-12-04. Retrieved 2019-12-04.
  12. ^ Godoy, Maria (5 January 2021). "Is The Pandemic Causing A Surge In Female Genital Mutilation?". NPR.org. Archived from the original on 2021-01-07. Retrieved 2021-01-08.
  13. ^ "Bill Announcement". whitehouse.gov. Archived from the original on 2021-01-20. Retrieved 2021-01-07 – via National Archives.
  14. ^ "'We will end female genital mutilation only by backing frontline activists". The Guardian. 2020-02-06. Archived from the original on 2020-04-13. Retrieved 2020-04-14.
  15. ^ "'Doctors in Britain are making money from mutilating girls' genitals". The Telegraph. 2020-02-07. Archived from the original on 2020-02-29. Retrieved 2020-04-14.

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