The One Minute Manager

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The One Minute Manager
The One Minute Manager.jpg
Author
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
GenreBusiness / Self-help / Motivational
PublisherWilliam Morrow & Co
Publication date
1982
Pages112
ISBN978-0-688-01429-2

The One Minute Manager is a short book by Ken Blanchard and Spencer Johnson. The brief volume tells a story, recounting three techniques and of an effective manager: one minute goals, one minute praisings, and one minute reprimands. Each of these takes only a minute but is purportedly of lasting benefit.[1] Shortly after publication the book became a New York Times bestseller.[2] The One Minute Manager has sold 15 million copies and been translated into 47 languages.[3]

Sequels[edit]

The book was followed by a sequel, Leadership and the One Minute Manager: A Situational Approach to Leading Others, by Ken Blanchard, Patricia Zigarmi and Drea Zigarmi, which laid out Blanchard's SLII® concept.[4]

New Edition[edit]

An updated edition of the book, The New One Minute Manager, was published in 2015.[5] In the new edition, the third technique, the one minute reprimand, was changed to the one minute re-direct.

Criticism[edit]

The concept has been called a management fad, and derivative of management by objectives, itself derived from the business planning literature.[6] One critic called it "the executive equivalent of paper-training your dog."[7]

Praise[edit]

The One Minute Manager has been widely praised for its universal appeal and for reducing esoteric management theory into simple, actionable techniques.[8][9] Time magazine cited it as one of the 25 Most Influential Business Management Books.[10]

Controversies[edit]

In 2001 the Wall Street Journal ran an article noting that The One Minute Manager bore a resemblance to an article written by Blanchard's former colleague, Arthur Elliot Carlisle.[11] [12] Carlisle's allegations of plagiarism were never proven.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Book review Archived 2011-01-01 at the Wayback Machine by Eric Spamer, Bruin Leaders Project, UCLA
  2. ^ "BEST SELLERS (Published 1982)". The New York Times. 1982-10-03. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-03-03.
  3. ^ egallant (2019-04-17). "Chief Spiritual Officer". UMass Magazine. Retrieved 2021-03-03.
  4. ^ Kenneth H. Blanchard, Patricia Zigarmi, and Drea Zigarmi. Leadership and the One Minute Manager: Increasing Effectiveness through Situational Leadership. New York: Morrow, 1985.
  5. ^ Blanchard and Johnson. "The New One Minute Manager". www.amazon.com. Retrieved 2021-03-03.
  6. ^ Miller, Danny; Hartwick, Jon (October 2002). "Spotting Management Fads" (PDF). Harvard Business Review: 27. Retrieved 2011-07-23.
  7. ^ Jackson, S. (January 20, 1986). "Management lingo: how to read between the lines". Business Week: 58., in Graeff, Claude L. (1997). "Evolution of Situational Leadership Theory: A Critical Review" (PDF). Leadership Quarterly. JAI Press, Inc. 8 (2): 156–157. Retrieved 2011-07-23.
  8. ^ "Top 50 Best Selling Management Books of All Time". Top Management Degrees. Retrieved 2021-03-03.
  9. ^ Summaries, Soundview Executive Book (2020-12-10). "The 25 Best Leadership Books of All-Time". Soundview Magazine. Retrieved 2021-03-03.
  10. ^ "The 25 Most Influential Business Management Books - TIME". TIME.com. Retrieved 2021-03-03.
  11. ^ Ober, Scot (2002). Business Communication (5 ed.). Houghton Mifflin College Division. p. 435. ISBN 0618343296.
  12. ^ The Liars' Club Archived 2018-04-29 at the Wayback Machine by Jon Entine, San Francisco Chronicle

External links[edit]