The Reader Magazine

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The Reader Magazine
The Reader Magazine logo.jpg
The Reader Magazine cover.jpg
Cover page, winter 2015
Editor Christopher Theodore[1]
Categories local news, global news
Frequency quarterly
Total circulation 390,000 (2017)[2][neutrality is disputed]
Founder Christopher Theodore
Hajnalka Hogue
Year founded November 2000
First issue January 2001 (2001-01)
Company Noble Media, Inc.
Country United States
Based in Redlands, California
Language English
Website www.reader.us

The Reader Magazine is a free, printed, quarterly magazine based in Redlands, California containing public interest journalism. It has a circulation of 390,000 by mail. In 2011 the magazine was accused of plagiarism by Columbia Journalism Review, which it denied.[3]

History[edit]

The Reader Magazine was founded by Christopher Theodore in November 2000 and originally called The Redlands Community Coupon Book. The first issue appeared January 2001.[4] The first issue was a twelve-page coupon magazine with four-pages of community news mailed to 30,000 households. From 2002 to 2004, the publication was called The Redlands Reader during which time The Yucaipa Reader was launched, which increased the circulation to 60,000 households.

In 2005, the name of the publication was changed to The Reader Magazine and circulation doubled to 120,000 households by including the cities of: Banning, Beaumont, Colton, Grand Terrace, Loma Linda, Highland, and San Bernardino.[5] As of 2015, the largest Reader Magazine of the four regional publications is 40-pages, half news content and half local advertising. The four Reader Magazines are mailed to a total of 390,000 persons in San Bernardino and Riverside counties.

In March 2018, Noble Media, which owns Reader, raised $200,000 in capital from the Valley Economic Development Center (VEDC), a non-profit community funder.[6]

Controversy[edit]

In 2011, The Reader Magazine was described in the Columbia Journalism Review as employing a business model based on plagiarism, when they identified a number of cases of suspected plagiarism in the publication.[7][8] These accusations were denied by The Reader. The Columbia Journalism Review subsequently reported that The Reader appeared to have reformed.[9] The Reader undertook legal action against the Columbia Journalism Review and the article's author.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Reader Magazine Publisher" (PDF). The Reader Magazine. Retrieved 29 November 2016. 
  2. ^ "The Reader". B Lab. 2017. Archived from the original on 2017-04-30. Retrieved 2018-04-13. 
  3. ^ Fry, Erika (October 28, 2011). "Plagiarism for Profit". Columbia Journalism Review. Archived from the original on December 11, 2016. Retrieved December 30, 2015. 
  4. ^ "The Reader Magazine 2011 Issue". The Reader Magazine. Archived from the original on 29 November 2016. Retrieved 29 November 2016. 
  5. ^ "The Reader Magazines Archive". The Reader Magazine. Retrieved 29 November 2016. 
  6. ^ "Noble Media Secures $200k in Investment Capital". finsmes.com (Press release). 2018-03-30. Archived from the original on 2018-04-14. Retrieved 2018-04-14. 
  7. ^ Fry, Erika (2011). "Plagiarism for Profit: California's Reader Magazine Has Grown Fat on Second-hand News". cjr.org. Columbia Journalism Review. Archived from the original on December 11, 2016. Retrieved December 11, 2016. 
  8. ^ "October was worst month this year for plagiarism, fabrication". Poynter Institute. December 21, 2011. Archived from the original on December 11, 2016. Retrieved 29 November 2016. 
  9. ^ Fry, Erika (December 14, 2011). "Reader Reforms". Columbia Journalism Review. Retrieved November 24, 2015. 
  10. ^ Koeninger, Kevin (November 9, 2012). "SoCal Mag Insists It's Not a Plagiarist". courthousenews.com. Courthouse News Service. Archived from the original on December 11, 2016. Retrieved December 11, 2016. 

External links[edit]