Tony Rosenthal

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
"Bernard Rosenthal" redirects here. For the American historian (born 1934), see Bernard Rosenthal (scholar).
Tony Rosenthal
Born Bernard Rosenthal
(1914-08-09)August 9, 1914
Highland Park, Illinois
Died July 28, 2009(2009-07-28) (aged 94)
Southampton, New York
Nationality American
Education University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Known for American abstract sculptor.
Movement American abstract expressionism

Bernard J. Rosenthal (August 9, 1914 - July 28, 2009),[1] also known as Tony Rosenthal, was an American abstract sculptor.

Biography[edit]

Tony Rosenthal was born August 9, 1914 in Highland Park, Illinois, a suburb of Chicago.[2][3] After attending sculpture classes at The Art Institute of Chicago in the early 1930s, he attended the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, where he graduated with a B.A. in 1936. He also studied with Archipenko in Chicago that year, and in 1939 attended the Cranbrook Academy of Art in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, where he studied with Carl Milles.

From 1942 to 1946, he served in the US Army, attending the Corps of Engineers Officer Candidate School in Virginia. Later he became a unit commander in England. In 1945, he taught at American University for the education of GIs in Biarritz, France.

In 1953, Rosenthal taught at the University of California, Los Angeles, CA

He died in Southampton, New York on July 28, 2009. He is survived by his wife, Cynthia Dillon Rosenthal.

Works[edit]

House of the Minotaur (1980) at Laumeier Sculpture Park

Rosenthal was best known for his large outdoor geometric abstract sculptures. His works in public places include:

See also[edit]

  • Harold Harby, Los Angeles City Council member who denounced Rosenthal's statuary for the Los Angeles Police Building
  • Earle D. Baker (1888–1987), Los Angeles City Council member who introduced a resolution to remove the Los Angeles Police Building statuary

References[edit]

  1. ^ Grimes, William, Tony Rosenthal, Sculptor of Public Art, Dies at 94, New York Times, July 31, 2009.
  2. ^ Tony Rosenthal (New York, NY : Rizzoli, 2000.) ISBN 0-8478-2316-4 pp. 58-67
  3. ^ American Abstract Expressionism of the 1950s An Illustrated Survey, (New York School Press, 2003.) ISBN 0-9677994-1-4. p.293
  4. ^ Tony Rosenthal (New York, NY : Rizzoli, 2000.) ISBN 0-8478-2316-4 p.6
  5. ^ American Abstract Expressionism of the 1950s An Illustrated Survey, (New York School Press, 2003.) ISBN 0-9677994-1-4. p.290
  6. ^ [1]

External links[edit]