Toshiro Konishi

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Toshiro Konishi (July 11, 1953 – April 17, 2016) was a Japanese Peruvian chef, musician, and television personality. Konishi, a pioneer of Japanese cuisine in Peru, opened one of the first Japanese restaurants in Lima in 1977.[1] He was one of Peru's most famous chefs, and became a recognized television personality in the country.[1][2] In 2008, the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries awarded him the Minister's Prize. Konishi was the first Japanese chef based in Latin America to receive the award from the ministry.[3]

Early life[edit]

Konishi was born on July 11, 1953. He was the fourth son of a Japanese restaurateur in Saito, Miyazaki Prefecture.[3] He began working in the kitchen when he was 11 years old. In 1971, he moved to Tokyo to become a chef at a restaurant called Fumi.[3]

Career[edit]

In 1977, Konishi moved from Japan to Peru to work with another chef, Nobu Matsuhisa, who is now known for his Nobu fusion restaurants in Peru, the United States, and other countries.[3] Konishi worked and operated a Lima restaurant called Matsuei, one of the first in the city to specialize in Japanese food, for ten years.[1][3] He then opened two additional Japanese eateries, Toshiro’s and Wako, which were located in Lima's Sheraton hotel.[3]

Konishi was an early pioneer of Peruvian Fusion cuisine, which mixes Japanese and Peruvian culinary traditions.[3] He was a regular participant in international food festivals.[3] He also taught at Universidad San Ignacio de Loyola in Lima.[3] He opened Mesa 18 at the Miraflores Hotel in Lima in 2013, and the Oishii, his most recent restaurant, in 2015.[2][4]

In 2008, the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries awarded him the Minister's Prize. Konishi was the first Japanese chef based in Latin America to receive the award from the ministry.[3]

Konishi died from cancer on April 17, 2016, at the age of 63.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Orange, Phillip (2016-04-18). "Peru's beloved Japanese chef passed away Sunday at the age of 63". Living in Peru. Retrieved 2016-05-14.
  2. ^ a b Arellano, Gustavo (2013-09-04). "Toshiro Konishi: Guru of Peruvian-Japanese Cuisine". OC Weekly. Retrieved 2016-05-14.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Toshiro Konishi interview". Discover Nikkei. October 2008. Retrieved 2016-05-14.
  4. ^ Arellano, Mauricio (2015-11-20). "Oishii, la nueva aventura del chef Toshiro Konishi". Publimetro. Retrieved 2016-05-14.