Truman Bradley (actor)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Truman Bradley (February 8, 1905 – July 28, 1974) was an actor and narrator in radio, television and film.

Early years[edit]

Bradley was born February 8, 1905, in Sheldon, Missouri. Although he wanted to be an actor, he followed his parents' desires and studied law.[1]

Career[edit]

Radio[edit]

Bradley began his career in the 1930s as a radio broadcaster. Working at WBBM[2] in Chicago, Illinois, some considered him "the Mid-West's leading news commentator."[3] He was selected by Henry Ford to be the announcer for the Ford Sunday Evening Hour, for which he flew to Detroit, Michigan, each weekend.[3] With his distinctive, authoritative voice, he soon became a radio actor as well as a narrator in numerous movies. In the mid-1940s, Bradley was a newscaster with KERN in Bakersfield, California.[4]

Bradley was the announcer for Red Skelton's program,[5] Burns and Allen[6] Easy Aces,[1] the Frank Sinatra Show[7] and Screen Guild Players.[8]

Film[edit]

A newspaper columnist wrote in 1942 that representatives of the film industry "had stalked him [Bradley] in Chicago, pouncing on him with such enthusiasm and rich offers that he could not, in honesty to himself, refuse."[3] He received critical praise for his work in The Night Before the Divorce in 1942.[3] He was also in Northwest Passage (1940),[9]Millionaires in Prison (1940)[10] and Murder Among Friends (1941).[11]

Television[edit]

Bradley was the host of the 1950s TV series Science Fiction Theatre.[12] He occasionally worked as an actor in films (including two Charlie Chan mysteries in the 1930s) and live theater.

Other business activities[edit]

In 1937, Bradley and his sister bought the Chicago-based Mme. Huntingford Cosmetic Company. He was the company's president, and Elene Bradley was general manager, "active in the sales end of the business."[13]

Family[edit]

Bradley married Evelyn Jane Esenther of Oak Park, Illinois, September 8, 1937.[13] He married actress Myra Bratton January 12, 1940, in Las Vegas, Nevada. Bratton filed for divorce in Los Angeles, California, March 17, 1941.[14] The divorce was granted November 17, 1941.[15]

He later had a complex relationship with actress Phyllis Ruth, whom he married in 1942. Three years later, she announced plans to file for divorce.[16] Early in 1946, however, a newspaper columnist reported: "The judge who ruled that Starlet Phyllis Ruth and Radio Announcer Truman Bradley could live in the same house, though separated, did a smart thing. They are reconciled now and are going to have a baby in June."[17] A July 14, 1946, column by Jimmie Fidler reported, "The Truman Bradleys ... got a six-pound baby girl."[18]

Death[edit]

Bradley died July 28, 1974, in Hollywood, California, at the Motion Picture Home.[19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Your Announcers Are". Radio Mirror. 6 (6): 63. October 1936. 
  2. ^ Wolters, Larry (June 30, 1936). "News of the Radio Stations". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 12. Retrieved 27 April 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c d Boesen, Vic (May 1, 1942). "Meet the Stars". Alton Evening Telegraph. p. 27. Retrieved April 25, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  4. ^ "Dial Dates (ad)". The Bakersfield Californian. May 25, 1945. p. 12. Retrieved April 26, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  5. ^ "Behind the Mike". Broadcasting. February 9, 1942. p. 32. Retrieved 28 April 2015. 
  6. ^ Fisher, George (April 1940). "Hollywood Radio Whispers". Radio and Television Mirror. 13 (6): 40, 74. 
  7. ^ "Frank Sinatra Show". Billboard. January 15, 1944. p. 26. Retrieved 26 April 2015. 
  8. ^ Abbott, Sam (October 31, 1942). "Hollywood". Billboard. p. 8. Retrieved 27 April 2015. 
  9. ^ https://www.newspapers.com/clip/2291074/the_pantagraph/
  10. ^ "(movie ad)". The Daily Mail. November 11, 1940. p. 2. Retrieved April 26, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  11. ^ "Exciting and Funny Murder Mystery at Henry's Theatre". The Daily Mail. May 15, 1941. p. 3. Retrieved April 25, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  12. ^ DeLong, Thomas A. (1996). Radio Stars: An Illustrated Biographical Dictionary of 953 Performers, 1920 through 1960. McFarland & Company, Inc. ISBN 978-0-7864-2834-2. P. 39.
  13. ^ a b "Bradley Buys Talc Firm But Continues in Radio". September 15, 1937. p. 26. Retrieved 27 April 2015. 
  14. ^ "Truman Bradley Sued Again by Wife". The Times. March 17, 1941. p. 14. Retrieved April 25, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  15. ^ "Divorces". Billboard. November 29, 1947. p. 46. Retrieved 26 April 2015. 
  16. ^ "Phyllis Ruth To Seek A Divorce". The Morning Herald. August 30, 1945. p. 5. Retrieved April 26, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  17. ^ Carroll, Harrison (January 23, 1946). "Behind The Scenes In Hollywood". The Morning Herald. p. 9. Retrieved April 26, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  18. ^ "Jimmie Fidler in Hollywood". Joplin Globe. July 14, 1946. p. 28. Retrieved April 26, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read
  19. ^ "Truman Bradley dies in Hollywood". The Pantagraph. July 29, 1974. p. 1. Retrieved April 25, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.  open access publication – free to read

External links[edit]