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Tyagi

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Tyagi is a surname with its origins in North India and Pakistan.The name is prevalent in both Hindu and Muslim communities, who share a common ancestor.[1] Once localized to Western Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Haryana, Rajasthan and Delhi, they are now also found in Sindh and Punjab provinces of Pakistan due to the migration of some Muslim Tyagis to those areas.[2][page needed] Taga and Tagha are alternative names that are sometimes used for the community. Surnames common to the community include Tyagi and Chaudhry.[3][page needed] Tyagi also meaning "sacrificing (oneself)" has led some Tyagis to claim Brahmin ancestors who rejected priestly occupations and were traditionally either landowning agriculturists or soldiers.[3]

Community members who converted to Islam are known as Muslim Tyagis[4] and as Mulla Brahmin, Musalman Taga, Mahesra and Moolay Taga.[5]

Notable people

Footnotes

  1. ^ Kripa Shankar Mathur, Binod C. Agrawal, Tribe, caste, and peasantry, Ethnographic & Folk Culture Society, U. P., 1974, p. 189, ... The present Hindu and Muslim Tyagis are the descendants of a common ancestor ... 
  2. ^ Paul R. Brass, Factional Politics in an Indian State, ... The Tyagis are a highly localized Hindu caste, found only in the northwestern districts of Uttar Pradesh, in Delhi, and in two eastern districts of the Punjab ... 
  3. ^ a b Brij Raj Chauhan, Extending frontiers of sociological learning, Dept. of Sociology, Institute of Advanced Studies, Meerut University, 1980, ... Economically, the Tyagis are the biggest landowning and cultivating category. This is reflected in the title 'Chaudhary' addressed for this caste by other castes. They share about 70% land ... 
  4. ^ Brij Raj Chauhan, Unesco, Rural-urban articulations, A.C. Bros., 1990, ISBN 978-81-85489-01-8, ... In Saharanpur district SC Dube described the Tyagi village where half of the population is of Muslim Tyagi and the other half of the Hindu Tyagi ... 
  5. ^ History of origin of some clans in India, with special reference to Jats (1992), Mangal Sen Jindal, Sarup & Sons, p. 159