Uncial 0206

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Uncial 0206
New Testament manuscript
Name P. Oxy. 1353
Text 1 Peter 5:5-13
Date 4th century
Script Greek
Found Oxyrhynchus, Egypt
Now at United Theological Seminary
Cite B. P. Grenfell & A. S. Hunt, OP XI (1915), pp. 5-6.
Size 14 x 10 cm
Type mixed
Category III

Uncial 0206 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament, dated paleographically to the 4th century.

Description[edit]

The surviving leaf contains a small parts of the First Epistle of Peter 5:5-13, on one parchment leaf (14 cm by 10 cm). The pages are small, and text is written in one column per page, 8 lines per page, in large monumental uncial letters. It originally formed part of a deluxe manuscript book collecting an extensive corpus of Christian texts.[1] The handwriting resembles Codex Sinaiticus.[2]

Barker notes that a page number added to the head of the verso had been misread by Grenfell, the original editor, as 229, but is in fact 829 (or possibly 819); demonstrating that the scribe had already filled over 800 pages of text before reaching the First Epistle of Peter. Even allowing for the exceptionally large scale of the writing, and the relatively small parchment pages, this would imply that the original codex must have contained a very substantial corpus of Christian writings; and would, for example, have been consistent with its consisting of the entirety of the eventual canon of Pauline and Catholic epistles.[3]

Text[edit]

The Greek text of this codex is representative of the Alexandrian text-type. Aland placed it in Category III.[1] According to Grenfell and Hunt its text is close to Codex Vaticanus.[2]

History[edit]

It is dated by the INTF to the 4th century.[1][4] Pasquale Orsini dated it to the second half of the 4th century.[5]

Don Barker proposes a wider and earlier range of dates for Uncial 0206, along with Papyrus 39, Papyrus 88 and Uncial 0232; and states that all four could be dated as early as the late second century or as late as the end of the fourth century.[3]

The manuscript was found in Oxyrhynchos by B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt. They published a description of its text.[2]

The manuscript was added to the list of the New Testament manuscripts by Ernst von Dobschütz in 1933.[6][7]

The codex is housed at the United Theological Seminary (P. Oxy. 1353) in Dayton.[1][4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Aland, Kurt; Aland, Barbara (1995). The Text of the New Testament: An Introduction to the Critical Editions and to the Theory and Practice of Modern Textual Criticism. Erroll F. Rhodes (trans.). Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company. p. 125. ISBN 978-0-8028-4098-1. 
  2. ^ a b c B. P. Grenfell & A. S. Hunt, Oxyrhynchus Papyri XI (London: Egypt Exploration Fund, 1915), pp. 5-6.
  3. ^ a b Barker, Don (2009). "How long and old is the codex of which P.Oxy 1353 is a leaf?" in "Jewish and Christian Scripture as artifact and canon" eds Craig. A. Evans and H. Daniel Zacharias. London: T&T Clark. pp. 192 to 202. ISBN 0-567-58485-2. 
  4. ^ a b "Liste Handschriften". Münster: Institute for New Testament Textual Research. Retrieved 23 April 2011. 
  5. ^ Codex 0206 (GA) LDAB
  6. ^ Kurt Aland (1963). Kurzgefasste Liste der griechieschen Handschriften des Neuen Testaments. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter. p. 10. 
  7. ^ Aland, Kurt; Aland, Barbara (1995). The Text of the New Testament: An Introduction to the Critical Editions and to the Theory and Practice of Modern Textual Criticism. Erroll F. Rhodes (trans.). Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company. p. 74. ISBN 978-0-8028-4098-1. 

Further reading[edit]


Grenfell and Hunt
Bernard Grenfell Arthur Hunt