WYCA

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WYCA
WYCA Rejoice102 logo.png
CityCrete, Illinois
Broadcast areaSouth Suburban Chicago
Kankakee, Illinois
Branding"Rejoice 102.3"
Slogan"Chicagoland's FM Gospel Choice"
Frequency102.3 FM(MHz)
(also on HD Radio)
First air dateOctober 1, 1964[1]
FormatBlack Gospel
ERP1,050 watts
HAAT152 meters (499 ft)
ClassA
Facility ID73700
Callsign meaningW "Y"oung people's "C"hurch of the "A"ir
Former callsignsWTAS (1965-1993)
WEMG-FM (1993-1997)
WYAA (1997-2000)
WVJM (2000-2001)[2][3]
WYCA (2001)
WYBA (2001-2003)[4]
Affiliationsnone
OwnerCrawford Broadcasting Co.
(Dontron, Inc.)
WebcastListen Live
Websitehttp://www.rejoice102.com

WYCA (102.3 FM) is licensed to Crete, Illinois, south of Chicago, with studios in Hammond, Indiana, and transmitter in Beecher, Illinois, south of Crete. The station is owned by Dontron, Inc., a subsidiary of Crawford Broadcasting Co.

WYCA is formatted as a religious station, primarily Black Gospel. The most popular program of the broadcast day is the "King's Highway" morning show, featuring Gospel Announcer Darryll King. Ms. King has won numerous awards for her work in Black Gospel Radio.[5] The remaining broadcast day is divided between Black Gospel music and various recorded and live broadcasts by local and national gospel ministers. Some program length commercial broadcasts are also aired.

WYCA broadcasts one channel in the HD Radio format.[6]

History[edit]

The station began broadcasting on October 1, 1964, as WTAS, and was originally owned by Anthony Santuccis's South Cook Broadcasting Inc.[1][7] WTAS had long aired a full service format, airing a variety of local programming and playing Middle of the road (MOR) music, which included pop standards and soft AC.[8][9][10][11][12] Much of the station's local news, talk and community programming was simulcast with its sister station 1600 WCGO in Chicago Heights, Illinois, until 1992.[9][10][13][12] In 1985, the station began airing the Warren Freiberg - Libby Collins Show, which had been heard on 106.3 WLNR in Lansing, Illinois since 1973.[13]

Early Gospel years[edit]

In 1992, WTAS began airing a black gospel format, simulcasting the programming of 1510 WWHN in Joliet, Illinois.[12][14][15] In 1993, the station was purchased by Word of Faith Fellowship, Inc. for $800,000,[16][17] and on October 22, 1993, its callsign was changed to WEMG-FM, with the station continuing to air a black gospel format.[4][18][19] In 1997, the station was sold to Dontron, Inc. for $1.8 million.[20] In summer 1997, the station was taken silent.[21] On October 31, 1997, the station's callsign was changed to WYAA.[4] The station returned to the air January 5, 1998.[22][23] As WYAA, the station played gospel oldies, love songs, and Christian jazz, along with brokered religious programming.[22]

Hot 102 & The Groove[edit]

On June 1, 2000, the station's callsign was changed to WVJM, and the station adopted an urban contemporary format as "Hot 102".[24] As an urban contemporary station, WVJM "Hot 102" carried the syndicated Doug Banks show.[24][25] On March 26, 2001, the station's urban contemporary format was moved to longtime gospel station WYCA 92.3 in Hammond, Indiana along with the call letters WVJM.[3][26] The call letters WYCA briefly moved to 102.3, before being moved to WYBA 106.3 in Lansing, Illinois on April 22, 2001, with 102.3 adopting WYBA as its callsign.[4][27] As WYBA, the station initially aired an R&B format as "The Groove".[28][29]

Rejoice 102[edit]

The station switched to its current Gospel music format as "Rejoice 102" on February 17, 2003.[29] On September 30, 2003, the station's callsign was changed to WYCA, as 106.3 in Lansing changed its callsign to WSRB and dropped its Gospel format in favor of an Urban AC format.[4][27] With the end of the Gospel format on 106.3, Gospel Announcer Darryll King moved her weekday program from 106.3 to 102.3, though she continues to host a show on 106.3 WSRB on Sundays.[5][30] WYCA is now the lone religious outlet for Crawford in the Chicago area.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Ghrist, John R. (1996). Valley Voices: A Radio History. Crossroads Communications. p. 272-277.
  2. ^ Tiny suburban upstart to take on No. 1 WGCI Feder, Robert. Chicago Sun Times. May 17, 2000. Accessed January 8, 2014
  3. ^ a b WYCA leaving religion for urban contemporary Feder, Robert. Chicago Sun Times. February 23, 2001. Accessed January 8, 2014
  4. ^ a b c d e Call Sign History, fcc.gov. Retrieved December 29, 2018.
  5. ^ a b Darryll King rejoice102.com. Accessed January 30, 2014
  6. ^ http://hdradio.com/station_guides/widget.php?id=3 HD Radio Guide for Chicago
  7. ^ "New FM Stations", Broadcasting. November 25, 1963. p. 104. Retrieved December 22, 2018.
  8. ^ "Stations By Format", Billboard. October 16, 1965. p. 62-63. Retrieved December 29, 2018.
  9. ^ a b "Stations, everywhere: a listeners' guide to the AM and FM bands", Chicago Tribune Magazine. March 4, 1979. p. 37. Retrieved December 29, 2018.
  10. ^ a b Chicago Radio Guide, Vol. 1, Issue 1. May 1985. Retrieved December 29, 2018.
  11. ^ Unmacht, Robert (1989). The M Street Radio Directory. p. S-96. Retrieved December 29, 2018.
  12. ^ a b c "Format Changes", The M Street Journal. Vol. 9, No. 32. August 12, 1992. p. 1. Retrieved December 29, 2018.
  13. ^ a b Osinchak, Sue. "The Morning Mom and Pop Talk Show", Radio Chicago. p. 20-21. Winter 1990. Retrieved December 29, 2018.
  14. ^ Weaver, Maurice. "Radio From The 'Bank'", Chicago Tribune. September 15, 1992. Retrieved December 29, 2018.
  15. ^ "Station Formats", Chicago Airwaves. p. 13. August 1993. Retrieved December 29, 2018.
  16. ^ Messmer, Jack. "DC Report", Radio & Records. September 17, 1993. p. 4. Retrieved December 29, 2018.
  17. ^ Public Notice Comment, fcc.gov. Retrieved December 29, 2018.
  18. ^ Chicago Area Station Formats", Chicago Airwaves. p. 13. November/December 1993. Retrieved December 29, 2018.
  19. ^ Unmacht, Robert; McCrummen, Pat; Heller, Jill; Apel, Steven (1995). The M Street Radio Directory. p. 192. Retrieved December 29, 2018.
  20. ^ "Transactions", Radio & Records. June 27, 1997. p. 6. Retrieved December 29, 2018.
  21. ^ "Format Changes & Updates", The M Street Journal. Vol. 14, No. 30. July 30, 1997. p. 2. Retrieved December 29, 2018.
  22. ^ a b The Shepherd's Guide. Eighth Edition. 1998. p. 120-121.
  23. ^ "Format Changes and Updates", The M Street Journal. Vol. 15, No. 3. January 21, 1998. p. 1. Retrieved December 29, 2018.
  24. ^ a b Doug Banks can't wait to take on WGCI Feder, Robert. Chicago Sun Times. June 20, 2000. Accessed January 8, 2014
  25. ^ Disc jockey back for battle Feder, Robert. Chicago Sun Times. July 6, 2000. Accessed January 8, 2014
  26. ^ Alan PD As WVJM/Chicago Signal Moves Radio & Records. March 21, 2001. (p. 5) Accessed January 8, 2014
  27. ^ a b Call Sign History fcc.gov. Accessed January 8, 2014
  28. ^ Station to station Knopper, Steve. Chicago Tribune. April 14, 2002. Accessed January 8, 2014
  29. ^ a b Tuesday, 02.18.03 DJHeadlines.com. February 18, 2003. Accessed January 8, 2014
  30. ^ Tuesday, 09.30.03 DJHeadlines.com. September 30, 2003. Accessed January 8, 2014

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 41°19′34″N 87°37′16″W / 41.326°N 87.621°W / 41.326; -87.621