William Hebard

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William Hebard
Member of the U. S. House of Representatives from Vermont's 2nd congressional district
In office
March 4, 1849 – March 3, 1853
Preceded by Jacob Collamer
Succeeded by Andrew Tracy
Member of the Vermont Senate
In office
1836
1838
Member of the Vermont House of Representatives
In office
1835
Personal details
Born November 29, 1800
Windham, Connecticut
Died October 20, 1875 (aged 74)
Chelsea, Orange County, Vermont
Political party

Whig

Republican
Profession

lawyer

politician

William Hebard (November 29, 1800 – October 20, 1875) was a United States Representative from Vermont.

Biography[edit]

Hebard was born in Windham, Connecticut. He attended the common schools and the Orange County Grammar School in Randolph, Vermont. He studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1827 and commenced practice in East Randolph, Vermont.[1]

Career[edit]

Hebard served as prosecuting attorney of Orange County from 1832 to 1836 and was a member of the Vermont House of Representatives in 1835. This was followed by service in the Vermont Senate in 1836 and 1838. He was a judge of probate of Randolph district in 1838, 1840, and 1841 and again a member of the Vermont House of Representatives from 1840 to 1842, Returning to the bench, he was elected associate judge of the Vermont Supreme Court in 1842 and 1844.[2]

Hebard moved to Chelsea, Vermont in 1845. He was elected as a Whig to the Thirty-first and Thirty-second Congresses (March 4, 1849 - March 3, 1853).[3] Named a delegate, he was active at state constitutional convention in 1857 and he was again a member of the general assembly in 1858, 1859, 1864, 1865, and 1872. He resumed the practice of law and was named a delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1860.[4]

Death[edit]

Hebard died in Chelsea, Orange County, Vermont, on October 20, 1875 (age 74 years, 325 days). He is interred at the Old Cemetery, Randolph Center, Vermont.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "William Hebard". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 21 December 2012. 
  2. ^ "William Hebard". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 21 December 2012. 
  3. ^ "William Hebard". Govtrack US Congress. Retrieved 21 December 2012. 
  4. ^ "William Hebard". The Political Graveyard. Retrieved 21 December 2012. 
  5. ^ "William Hebard". Find A Grave. Retrieved 21 December 2012. 

External links[edit]


United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Jacob Collamer
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Vermont's 2nd congressional district

1849-1853
Succeeded by
Andrew Tracy