William Lucas (actor)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
William Lucas
William Lucas (1925–2016) playing Dr. James Gordon (The Adventures of Black Beauty).png
William Lucas playing Dr. James Gordon in The Adventures of Black Beauty
Born William Thomas Clucas
(1925-04-14)14 April 1925
Manchester, Lancashire, England
Died 8 July 2016(2016-07-08) (aged 91)
England
Years active 1950–2005

William Thomas Clucas (14 April 1925 – 8 July 2016),[1] better known as William Lucas, was an English film, theatre, radio and television actor.

Early years[edit]

Lucas was born in Manchester, England.[2] Before he became an actor, Lucas was a commercial traveller, laundry hand, cook, farm labourer, and long-distance lorry driver and served in the Royal Navy during the Second World War.[3]

Stage[edit]

Lucas had dramatic training at the Northern Theatre School, having earned a scholarship there. He went from the school to being an assistant stage manager at the Chesterfield Civic Theatre in the late 1940s.[2] Lucas had begun his stage career by the summer of 1950 in Chesterfield[4] and was still active in the theatre in late 1990 in Run for Your Wife.[5]

Film[edit]

Lucas' first film acting role was in the film Portrait of Alison (1955), and he later appeared in many Hammer Film Productions such as The Shadow of the Cat.

Television[edit]

Lucas is probably best known for his role in The Adventures of Black Beauty (1972–74) as Dr. James Gordon, and in the BBC series Sherlock Holmes as Inspector Lestrade in the episode "A Study in Scarlet" (1968). He has also appeared in The Bill, Doctor Who, Last of the Summer Wine, and long-running ITV soap opera Coronation Street.[6][7]

Personal life[edit]

In 1954, Lucas married Doreen Moorehouse (whose stage name was Rowena Ingram), and they had two children. After they divorced, he married Camilla Idris-Jones.[2]

Death[edit]

Lucas died in England on 8 July 2016.[2]

TV shows[edit]

Feature films[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hayward, Anthony (17 July 2016). "William Lucas obituary". The Guardian. Retrieved 17 July 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c d Lentz, Harris III (September 2016). "William Lucas, 91". Classic Images (495): 58. 
  3. ^ "TeleBriefs", The Stage, page 12, 24 November 1955
  4. ^ The Stage, page 13, 3 August 1950
  5. ^ "Production news", The Stage and Television Today, page 15, 29 November 1990
  6. ^ [1] Television roles
  7. ^ Born: 14 April 1925, Manchester (1925-04-14). "William Lucas | BFI | BFI". Explore.bfi.org.uk. Retrieved 2014-03-25. 

External links[edit]