World Fantasy Convention Award

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World Fantasy Convention Award
Awarded for Peerless contributions to the fantasy genre
Presented by World Fantasy Convention
First awarded 1978
Last awarded 1997
Most recent winner Hugh B. Cave
Official website worldfantasy.org/awards/

The World Fantasy Awards are given each year by the World Fantasy Convention for the best fantasy fiction published in English during the previous calendar year. The awards have been described by book critics such as The Guardian as a "prestigious fantasy prize",[1] and one of the three most prestigious speculative fiction awards, along with the Hugo and Nebula Awards (which cover both fantasy and science fiction).[2][3] The World Fantasy Convention Award is a special award given in some years for "peerless contributions to the fantasy genre".[4] These have included authors, editors, and publishers. More regular special awards are given out for professional or non-professional work in the prior year in the Special Award—Professional and Special Award—Non-professional categories. A Life Achievement award is also given annually. The World Fantasy Convention Award was first given in 1978; it was given annually through 1987 and again in 1997.[5] It has not been awarded since, though it is still listed as an official award.[6]

Most World Fantasy Award nominees and winners are decided by attendees and judges of the annual World Fantasy Convention. A ballot is posted in June for attendees of the current and previous two conferences to determine two of the finalists, and a panel of five judges adds three or more nominees before voting on the overall winner.[5][6] The panel of judges is typically made up of fantasy authors[7] and is chosen each year by the World Fantasy Awards Administration, which has the power to break ties.[5] Unlike the other World Fantasy Award categories, the Convention Award has no nominees and is not decided in the usual way; instead, the winner is selected by the convention organizers themselves and announced along with the nominees in the other categories.[5][6] The final results are presented at the World Fantasy Convention at the end of October.[6] Through 2015, winners were presented with a statuette of H. P. Lovecraft, but at the 2015 ceremony it was announced that the statuette would not be given out in future years. No announcement was made about a replacement award.[8]

During the 11 active years, 11 people and 1 publishing house have been given the Convention Award. Less than half of the winners are primarily known for their writing, as opposed to editing work or artwork. Six of the winners have gone on to be awarded the Lifetime Achievement award, sometimes only a few years after they were given a Convention Award: Evangeline Walton four years later in 1989, Andre Norton eleven years later in 1998, Hugh B. Cave two years later in 1999, Donald M. Grant nineteen years later in 2003, and Stephen King and Gahan Wilson twenty-four and twenty-three years later in 2004.

Winners[edit]

In the following table, the years correspond to the date of the ceremony. Items in the Work(s) column are items and companies that the winner created or worked at; they are meant to be representative of the winner's career in the field of fantasy to that point, but the World Fantasy Convention Award is not given for any specific achievement, and no such achievements are listed by the World Fantasy Convention as reasons for the award. In some cases the winner is well-known for their non-fantasy works, such as science fiction novels, which are not listed.

Year Winner(s) Work(s) Ref.
1978 Lord, GlennGlenn Lord editing and publishing Robert E. Howard [9]
1979 McCauley, KirbyKirby McCauley literary agent for Stephen King, chaired first World Fantasy Convention [10]
1980 King, StephenStephen King The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger, The Stand [11]
1981 Wilson, GahanGahan Wilson Artwork for The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, The New Yorker [12]
1982 Krenkel, RoyRoy Krenkel Artwork for Weird Fantasy, Weird Science-Fantasy [13]
Brennan, Joseph PayneJoseph Payne Brennan Nine Horrors and a Dream, short fiction in Weird Tales [13]
1983 Arkham House Fantasy and horror publisher [14]
1984 Grant, Donald M.Donald M. Grant Founder and publisher for Donald M. Grant, Publisher [15]
1985 Walton, EvangelineEvangeline Walton The Island of the Mighty, The Song of Rhiannon [16]
1986 Wollheim, Donald A.Donald A. Wollheim Editor at Ace Books, founder and editor at DAW Books [17]
1987 Norton, AndreAndre Norton Witch World, High Sorcery [18]
1997 Cave, Hugh B.Hugh B. Cave Murgunstrumm and Others, Death Stalks the Night [19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Flood, Alison (2014-09-17). "World Fantasy awards pressed to drop HP Lovecraft trophy in racism row". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 2015-01-18. Retrieved 2015-01-30. 
  2. ^ Tan, Corrie (2013-09-17). "'It's not like I can sell awards for money'". The Star. Malaysia. Archived from the original on 2013-09-24. Retrieved 2013-09-24. 
  3. ^ Hermann, Brenda (1991-12-20). "Comic Book Wins Fiction Award For First, And Maybe Last, Time". Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on 2013-09-24. Retrieved 2013-09-24. 
  4. ^ Jones, Stephen (2004-06-29). "Stephen Jones remembers Hugh B. Cave". Locus. Archived from the original on 2015-10-05. Retrieved 2015-11-23. 
  5. ^ a b c d "World Fantasy Awards About the". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2015-09-28. Retrieved 2013-09-23. 
  6. ^ a b c d "World Fantasy Award Judges". World Fantasy Awards Administration. Archived from the original on 2013-01-13. Retrieved 2013-09-23. 
  7. ^ Walling, René (2011-06-28). "The Coming of the Great Old Ones: A Statistical Look at the World Fantasy Awards for Best Novel". Tor.com. Tor Books. Archived from the original on 2013-08-22. Retrieved 2013-09-24. 
  8. ^ Flood, Alison (2015-11-09). "World Fantasy award drops HP Lovecraft as prize image". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 2015-11-18. Retrieved 2015-11-20. 
  9. ^ "World Fantasy Awards 1978". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2015-06-30. Retrieved 2013-09-20. 
  10. ^ "World Fantasy Awards 1979". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2015-06-30. Retrieved 2013-09-20. 
  11. ^ "World Fantasy Awards 1980". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2015-06-30. Retrieved 2013-09-20. 
  12. ^ "World Fantasy Awards 1981". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2015-06-30. Retrieved 2013-09-20. 
  13. ^ a b "World Fantasy Awards 1982". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2015-06-29. Retrieved 2013-09-20. 
  14. ^ "World Fantasy Awards 1983". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2014-11-05. Retrieved 2013-09-20. 
  15. ^ "World Fantasy Awards 1984". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2015-06-30. Retrieved 2013-09-20. 
  16. ^ "World Fantasy Awards 1985". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2015-06-30. Retrieved 2013-09-20. 
  17. ^ "World Fantasy Awards 1986". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2015-06-30. Retrieved 2013-09-20. 
  18. ^ "World Fantasy Awards 1987". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2015-06-30. Retrieved 2013-09-20. 
  19. ^ "World Fantasy Awards 1997". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2015-06-30. Retrieved 2013-09-20. 

External links[edit]