Yvonne Hughes

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Yvonne Hughes
Born Yvonne Evelyn Hughes
1900
McKeesport, Pennsylvania
Died December 26, 1950
New York City, New York
Occupation Actress, dancer
Spouse(s) Gordon Godowsky (1928-1929)
Partner(s) John McDonald (1936-1950)

Yvonne Hughes (1900 - December 26, 1950) was a dancer in the Ziegfeld Follies and an actress in silent motion pictures.

Biography[edit]

Career and personal life[edit]

Hughes appeared in films with Gloria Swanson and once danced with Rudolph Valentino. Her movie appearances came in 1923 and 1924. She had roles in Lawful Larceny, Zaza, Big Brother, A Society Scandal, and Monsieur Beaucaire. She also appeared in Rio Rita, and Whoopi! 1928-1929, a musical comedy.

In 1928, Hughes married Gordon Godowsky, son of Leopold Godowsky. The marriage lasted one year. In 1932, Godowsky committed suicide over financial trouble.

Murder[edit]

On December 26, 1950, Hughes was murdered in the New York City hotel room of Birger Nordkvist, a Swedish apple picker who worked for a western New York cider firm. Earlier that night, Nordkvist got into a cab driven by John McDonald, who had lived with Hughes for fourteen years. McDonald offered to take him to the Ashland Hotel, where he kept a room. Nordkvist met Hughes, who demonstrated some old dance routines for him, and they drank beer through the night and into the next morning; all the while, McDonald was driving his taxi. After Hughes rebuffed Nordkvist's advances, Nordkvist strangled her by tying his handkerchief around her throat and stuffing a silk scarf into her mouth. Nordkvist was arrested in Utica, New York where he went after leaving the hotel.

Selected Filmography[edit]

References[edit]

  • New York Times, "Apple Picker Held For Hotel Killing", December 29, 1950, Page 12.
  • Pasco, Washington Tri-City Herald, "Question Apple Picker After Aging Follies Beauty Found Strangled", December 27, 1950, Page 2.
  • San Mateo, California Times, "Ziegfeld Girl Strangled", December 26, 1950, Page 2.

External links[edit]