(137108) 1999 AN10

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
(137108) 1999 AN10
1999an10.jpg
Discovery and designation
Discovered by LINEAR
Discovery date January 13, 1999
Designations
MPC designation (137108) 1999 AN10
Minor planet category Apollo asteroid
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 2013-Apr-18
JD 2456400.5
Aphelion 2.2787 AU (Q)
Perihelion 0.63880 AU (q)
Semi-major axis 1.4587 AU (a)
Eccentricity 0.56209
Orbital period 1.76 a
Mean anomaly 347.23° (M)
Inclination 39.931°
Longitude of ascending node 314.41°
Argument of perihelion 268.32°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 800 - 1800 m[2][3]
Mass ~2.9×1012 kg[4]
Equatorial escape velocity ~2.8 km/h[4]
Absolute magnitude (H) 17.8[1]

(137108) 1999 AN10 is an Apollo near-Earth asteroid (NEA) discovered by LINEAR on January 13, 1999.[5]

On August 7, 2027, this NEA will pass within 0.0026 AU (390,000 km; 240,000 mi) (~1 lunar distance) of the Earth.[6][7][8][9] During the close approach, the asteroid should peak at about apparent magnitude 7.3,[10] and will be visible in binoculars.

1999 AN10 has a well determined orbit with an observation arc of 58 years.[1] It was found by Andreas Doppler and Arno Gnädig in precovery images from 1955.[1] When 1999 AN10 only had an observation arc of 123 days, there was a 1 in 10 million chance that it could return on an impact trajectory in 2039.[11]

On August 7, 1946, the asteroid passed 0.00625 AU (935,000 km; 581,000 mi) from Earth and then 0.00404 AU (604,000 km; 376,000 mi) from the Moon.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 137108 (1999 AN10)". Retrieved 2013-03-10. 
  2. ^ "137108 1999 AN10". The Near-Earth Asteroids Data Base at E.A.R.N. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ Absolute magnitude to diameter conversion table
  4. ^ a b assume radius of 0.650 km; volume of a sphere * assume density of 2.6g/cm³ (though it could be a loose rubble pile) yields a mass of 2.99e12 kg and an escape velocity of 2.82 km/h.
  5. ^ Hannu, Karttunen; Vilppu, Piirola (1999). Astrophysics with the NOT: Proceedings of the conference held in Turku on August 12–15, 1998. University of Turku. p. 270. ISBN 951-29-1615-0. 
  6. ^ Piero Sicoli, Francesco Manca. "Sormano Astronomical Observatory: Table of Next Closest Approaches to the Earth by Asteroids". Astronomical Observatory of Brera. Archived from the original on 1 December 2007. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  7. ^ a b "JPL Close-Approach Data: 137108 (1999 AN10)". 2006-08-04 last obs (arc=51.5 years). Retrieved 2011-10-17. 
  8. ^ "NEODys (137108) 1999AN10". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, ITALY. Archived from the original on 2009-04-18. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  9. ^ "MPEC 1999-N21: 1999 AN10". IAU: Minor Planet Center. 1999 July 12, 21:23. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  10. ^ "1999AN10 Ephemerides for 7 Aug 2027". NEODyS (Near Earth Objects - Dynamic Site). Retrieved 2011-10-16. 
  11. ^ Paul W. Chodas, Research Scientist, Near Earth Object Program Office, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (1999-05-18). "The Continuing Story Of Asteroid 1999 AN10". Archived from the original on 26 October 2010. Retrieved 2010-10-22. 

External links[edit]