1968 Giro d'Italia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
1968 Giro d'Italia
Race details
Dates 20 May - 12 June
Stages 22 + Prologue
Distance 3,917.3 km (2,434 mi)
Winning time 108h 42' 27" (36.035 km/h or 22.391 mph)
Palmares
Winner  Eddy Merckx (BEL) (Team Faema)
Second  Vittorio Adorni (ITA) (Team Faema)
Third  Felice Gimondi (ITA) (Salvarani)

Points  Eddy Merckx (BEL) (Team Faema)
Mountains  Eddy Merckx (BEL) (Team Faema)
Team Faema
1967
1969

The 1968 Giro d'Italia of cycling, 51st edition of the Corsa Rosa, was held from 20 May to 11 June 1968. It consisted of 22 stages and was won by Eddy Merckx.[1][2]

Teams[edit]

A total of 13 teams were invited to participate in the 1968 Giro d'Italia.[3][4] Each team sent a squad of ten riders so the Giro began with a peloton of 130 cyclists.[3][4] Out of the 130 riders that started this edition of the Giro d'Italia, a total of 98 riders made it to the finish in Naples where eight riders were subsequently disqualified for testing positive for drugs leaving the general classification tally at 90 riders.[5]

The 13 teams that took part in the race were:[3][4]

  • Bic
  • Faema
  • Fagor-Fargas
  • Filotex
  • G.B.C.
  • Germanvox-Vega
  • Kelvinator
  • Max Meyer
  • Molteni
  • Pepsi
  • Peugeot
  • Salvarani
  • Smiths

Route and stages[edit]

Stage results[5][6]
Stage Date Course Distance Type Winner
P 20 May Campione d'Italia 5.7 km (4 mi) History.gif Individual time trial  Charly Grosskost (FRA)[N 1]
1 21 May Campione d'Italia to Novara 128 km (80 mi) Plain stage  Eddy Merckx (BEL)
2 22 May Novara to Saint-Vincent 189 km (117 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Eddy Merckx (BEL)[N 2]
3 23 May Saint-Vincent to Alba 168 km (104 mi) Plain stage  Guido Reybrouck (BEL)
4 24 May Alba to Sanremo 162 km (101 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Ward Sels (BEL)
5 25 May Sanremo to Sanremo 149 km (93 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Italo Zilioli (ITA)
6 26 May Sanremo to Alessandria 223 km (139 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  José Antonio Momene (ESP)
7 27 May Alessandria to Piacenza 174 km (108 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Guerrino Tosello (ITA)
8 28 May San Giorgio Piacentino to Brescia 225 km (140 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Eddy Merckx (BEL)
9 29 May Brescia to Lido di Caldonazzo 210 km (130 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Julio Jiménez (ESP)
10 30 May Trento to Monte Grappa 136 km (85 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Emilio Casalini (ITA)
11 31 May Bassano del Grappa to Trieste 197 km (122 mi) Plain stage  Guido Reybrouck (BEL)
12 1 June Gorizia to Tre Cime di Lavaredo 213 km (132 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Eddy Merckx (BEL)
13 2 June Cortina d'Ampezzo to Vittorio Veneto 163 km (101 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Lino Farisato (ITA)
14 3 June Vittorio Veneto to Marina Romea 199 km (124 mi) Plain stage  Luigi Sgarbozza (ITA)
15 4 June Ravenna to Imola 141 km (88 mi) Plain stage  Marino Basso (ITA)
5 June Rest day
16 6 June Cesenatico to San Marino (San Marino) 49.3 km (31 mi) History.gif Individual time trial  Felice Gimondi (ITA)
17 7 June San Marino (San Marino) to Foligno 196 km (122 mi) Plain stage  Franco Bitossi (ITA)
18 8 June Foligno to Abbadia San Salvatore 166 km (103 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Julio Jiménez (ESP)
19 9 June Abbadia San Salvatore to Rome 181 km (112 mi) Plain stage  Luciano Dalla Bona (ITA)
20 10 June Rome to Rocca di Cambio 215 km (134 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Luis Pedro Santamarina (ESP)
21 11 June Rocca di Cambio to Blockhaus 198 km (123 mi) Stage with mountain(s)  Franco Bitossi (ITA)[N 3]
22 12 June Chieti to Naples 235 km (146 mi) Plain stage  Guido Reybrouck (BEL)
Total 3,917.3 km (2,434 mi)

Race overview[edit]

The race's twelfth stage saw heavy rain from the start of the stage in Gorizia, which turned to snow as the race began to elevate into the Dolomites.[7] Police lined the sides of the roads of the Tre Cime di Lavaredo as the riders passed through due to incidents that occurred on the slopes the previous year.[7] The leading group on the road had a ten minute advantage on Eddy Merckx.[7] Merckx was able to traverse the ten-minute gap, win the stage, and take the lead of the race.[7][8]

Classification Leadership[edit]

Two different jerseys were worn during the 1969 Giro d'Italia. The leader of the general classification – calculated by adding the stage finish times of each rider – wore a pink jersey. This classification is the most important of the race, and its winner is considered as the winner of the Giro.[9]

For the points classification, which awarded a red jersey to its leader,[10] cyclists were given points for finishing a stage in the top 15.[11] The mountains classification leader. The climbs were ranked in first and second categories. In this ranking, points were won by reaching the summit of a climb ahead of other cyclists. Although no jersey was awarded, there was also one classification for the teams, in which the stage finish times of the best three cyclists per team were added; the leading team was the one with the lowest total time.[9]

Stage Winner General classification
Points classification
A red jersey
Mountains classification Team classification
P Charly Grosskost Charly Grosskost not awarded not awarded not awarded
1 Eddy Merckx Eddy Merckx Eddy Merckx Faema
2 Eddy Merckx[N 2] Julio Jiménez
3 Guido Reybrouck Michele Dancelli
4 Ward Sels Guido Reybrouck
5 Italo Zilioli Julio Jiménez & Eddy Merckx
6 José Antonio Momene Eddy Merckx
7 Guerrino Tosello Mariano Díaz
8 Eddy Merckx
9 Julio Jiménez Julio Jiménez
10 Emilio Casalini
11 Guido Reybrouck
12 Eddy Merckx Eddy Merckx Eddy Merckx
13 Lino Farisato
14 Luigi Sgarbozza
15 Marino Basso
16 Felice Gimondi
17 Franco Bitossi
18 Julio Jiménez
19 Luciano Dalla Bona
20 Luis Pedro Santamarina
21 Franco Bitossi[N 3]
22 Guido Reybrouck
Final Eddy Merckx Eddy Merckx Eddy Merckx Faema

Final standings[edit]

Legend
  A pink jersey   Denotes the winner of the General classification[1]   A red jersey   Denotes the winner of the Points classification[1]

General classification[edit]

Final general classification (1–10)[1][5][12][13][14]
Rank Name Team Time
1  Eddy Merckx (BEL) Pink jersey green jersey Faema 108h 42' 27"
2  Vittorio Adorni (ITA) Faema + 5' 01"
3  Felice Gimondi (ITA) Salvarani + 9' 05"
4  Italo Zilioli (ITA) Filotex + 9' 17"
5  Willy Vanneste (BEL) Bic + 10' 43"
DSQ  Gianni Motta (ITA)[N 2] Molteni + 12' 23"
6  Michele Dancelli (ITA) Pepsi Cola + 12' 33"
7  Franco Balmamion (ITA) Molteni + 15' 43"
8  Francisco Gabica (ESP) Fagor + 16' 59"
9  Franco Bitossi (ITA) Filotex + 19' 02"
10  Julio Jiménez (ESP) Bic + 19' 51"

Points classification[edit]

Final points classification (1–5)[1][5][13][14]
Rank Name Team Points
1  Eddy Merckx (BEL) green jersey Pink jersey Faema 198
2  Franco Bitossi (ITA) Filotex 138
3  Michele Dancelli (ITA) Pepsi Cola 132
DSQ  Gianni Motta (ITA)[N 2] Molteni 122
4  Marino Basso (ITA) Molteni 122
5  Guido Reybrouck (BEL) Faema 115
6  Felice Gimondi (ITA) Salvarani 96
7  Vittorio Adorni (ITA) Faema 88
8  Italo Zilioli (ITA) Filotex 73
9  Julio Jiménez (ESP) Bic
10  Vito Taccone (ITA) Germanvox 60

Mountains classification[edit]

Final mountains classification (1–6)[1][5][15]
Rank Name Team Points
1  Eddy Merckx (BEL) Pink jersey green jersey Faema 340
2  Julio Jiménez (ESP) Bic 180
3  Giancarlo Polidori (ITA) Pepsi Cola 140
 Joaquín Galera (ESP) Fagor
5  Guido Reybrouck (BEL) Faema 90
6  Guido Reybrouck (BEL) Faema 90

References[edit]

Footnotes
  1. ^ The times from the first stage did not count towards the general classification, but were used to determine what rider would wear the race leader's maglia rosa on the first stage of the race.[5]
  2. ^ a b c d The original stage winner, Gianna Motta, was found to have used performance enhancing drugs and his results were subsequently voided.
  3. ^ a b The original stage winner, Franco Bodrero, was found to have used performance enhancing drugs and his results were subsequently voided.
Citations
  1. ^ a b c d e f "Perlas del "Giro"" (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo. 13 June 1968. p. 18. Retrieved 21 April 2013. 
  2. ^ "Giro d'Italia" [Tour of Italy] (in Spanish). El Mundo Deportivo. 13 June 1968. p. 18. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c "Partono in 129 (la Pepsi rinuncia al decimo)" [Start at 129 (Pepsi waiver to tenth)]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 20 May 1968. p. 3. Archived from the original on 28 December 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c "Partono in 130, Brand nella Pepsi" [Starting in 130, in the Pepsi Brand]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 21 May 1968. p. 3. Archived from the original on 28 December 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f Bill and Carol McGann. "1968 Giro d'Italia". Bike Race Info. Dog Ear Publishing. Archived from the original on 2013-07-11. Retrieved 2012-07-10. 
  6. ^ "Un Giro ad alta quota" [A ride at high altitude]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 20 May 1968. p. 3. Archived from the original on 28 December 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013. 
  7. ^ a b c d Fotheringham 2013, p. 55.
  8. ^ Fotheringham 2013, p. 74.
  9. ^ a b Laura Weislo (13 May 2008). "Giro d'Italia classifications demystified". Cycling News. Future Publishing Limited. Archived from the original on 17 June 2014. Retrieved 13 July 2013. 
  10. ^ "Trofeo Dreher Forte" [Dreher Forte Trophy]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 20 May 1969. p. 4. Archived from the original on 28 December 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013. 
  11. ^ "Regolamento" [Regulation]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 19 May 1966. p. 9. Archived from the original on 23 December 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013. 
  12. ^ &query=
  13. ^ a b "Adorni punito per aver ingannato l'antidoping?" [Adorni punished for having deceived the doping?] (PDF). l'Unità (in Italian) (PCI). 12 June 1968. p. 6. Archived from the original on 28 December 2014. Retrieved 27 May 2012. 
  14. ^ a b "Il Giro in cifre" [The Tour in figures]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 12 June 1968. p. 6. Archived from the original on 23 December 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013. 
  15. ^ "Il Giro in cifre" [The Tour in figures]. Corriere dello Sport (in Italian). 11 June 1968. p. 8. Archived from the original on 23 December 2014. Retrieved 7 July 2013. 
Bibliography