2010 GA6

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2010 GA6
2010GA6 in April 8 2010.jpg
2010 GA6, captured by Purple Mountain Observatory in April 8, 2010
Discovery[1]
Discovered by Catalina Sky Survey
Discovery date April 5, 2010
Designations
none
Orbital characteristics
Epoch 2455400.5 (2010-Jul-23.0)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 22 meters (72 ft)[2]
25.9[2]

2010 GA6 is a near-Earth asteroid discovered by the Catalina Sky Survey on April 5, 2010,[1] four days before a close approach to Earth. It is a relatively small space rock about 22 meters (72 ft) wide.[2] With a 1-day observation arc, the asteroid had a 1 in 6 million chance of impacting in 2074.[3] It was removed from the Sentry Risk Table on April 8, 2010.[4] The asteroid passed Earth at a distance of about 0.0029 AU (430,000 km; 270,000 mi) at 02:07 UT on April 9, 2010 (7:06 pm EST on April 8).[2][5][6][7] A stony asteroid 22 meters in diameter can be expected to create an air burst with the equivalent of 300 kilotons of TNT at an altitude of 21 kilometers (69,000 ft).[8] Generally only asteroids larger than 35 meters across pose a threat to a town or city.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "MPEC 2010-G23 : 2010 GA6". IAU Minor Planet Center. 2010-04-05. Retrieved 2013-02-08.  (K10G06A)
  2. ^ a b c d "Asteroid to Fly by Within Moon's Orbit Thursday". NASA/JPL. April 6, 2010. Retrieved 2013-02-08. 
  3. ^ "Observations of small Solar-System bodies". hohmanntransfer. 2010-04-07. Retrieved 2013-02-08.  (1.6e-07 = 1 in 6,250,000 chance)
  4. ^ "Date/Time Removed". NASA/JPL Near-Earth Object Program Office. Retrieved 2012-03-19. 
  5. ^ "JPL Close-Approach Data: (2010 GA6)". 2013-01-20 last obs (arc=4 days). Retrieved 2013-02-08.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  6. ^ Newfound Asteroid to Buzz Earth Thursday
  7. ^ Newly Discovered Asteroid Will Pass by Earth April 8
  8. ^ Robert Marcus, H. Jay Melosh, and Gareth Collins (2010). "Earth Impact Effects Program". Imperial College London / Purdue University. Retrieved 2013-02-04.  (solution using 22 meters, 2600kg/m^3, 17km/s, 45 degrees)
  9. ^ Will Ferguson (January 22, 2013). "Asteroid Hunter Gives an Update on the Threat of Near-Earth Objects". Scientific American. Retrieved 2013-01-23. 

External links[edit]