2011 European Cross Country Championships

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2011 European Cross Country Championships
Organisers EAA
Edition 18th
Date 11 December
Host city Velenje, Slovenia
Races 6
Distances 9870 m – Men
8170 m – Women
8170 m – U23 men
6070 m – U23 women
6070 m – Junior men
3970 m – Junior women
Official website Velenje 2011

The 2011 European Cross Country Championships was the 18th edition of the cross country running competition for European athletes which was held in Velenje, Slovenia on 11 December.

Atelaw Yeshetela of Belgium won the men's title to become the country's first ever champion at the competition. The French men's team retained their title from 2010.[1] Fionnuala Britton was the winner in the senior women's race, becoming Ireland's second champion in the history of the event after Catherina McKiernan (who won the inaugural race in 1994).[2][3] The senior women's team race was won by Great Britain.[4]

Preparation[edit]

The city won the rights to the event at the 120th meeting of the European Athletics Council in 2007. It was the second time that Velenje hosted the event, following its hosting of the 1999 edition.[5] The event mascot, Ligi (an anthropomorphic black mole), returned after its introduction in 1999. In the intervening years, the mascot was used for a number of events in the city and represents the importance of lignite (brown coal) in the city's economy.[6]

Alongside international television broadcasts, European Athletics broadcast the event live on the governing body's official website.[7]

The 2010 champion Jéssica Augusto was absent from the competition.

The championships featured six races: there were senior, under-23, and under-20 junior categories for each of the sexes. The men's senior race had a 9870-metre distance, while the women's senior and men's under-23 races were held over 8040 m. The men's junior race and women's under-23 contests were over 6070 m. The junior women had a 3970 m distance to cover.[8] The course for the competition was based near the grounds of the Atletski Klub Velenje (Velenje Athletics Club). It had a relatively flat race profile with no significant inclines and comprises two loops (a 1500 m loop and a shorter 300 m circuit).[9]

Five European Athletics permit meetings preceded the championships on the weekend of 26–27 November: the Skanzen meeting in Budapest, the Cross de l'Acier in Leffrinckoucke, the Warandecross in Tilburg, the Lotto CrossCup van West-Vlaanderen in Roeselare, and the Cross Internacional Valle de Llodio in Llodio.[10] These races and national-level trial events were the primary means of athletes gaining selection for the championships.

Ukraine's Serhiy Lebid returned to defend his 2010 title and the nine-time champion was the pre-race favourite. The 2010 women's champion, Jéssica Augusto, did not enter the competition as she was still recovering from her outing at the 2011 New York City Marathon.[11] The other leading finishers from 2010 – Binnaz Uslu, Ana Dulce Félix and Fionnuala Britton – were among the favourites for the women's race.[12]

Race results[edit]

Atelaw Yeshetela became the first Belgian to win the competition.

Senior men[edit]

Individual race
Rank Athlete Country Time (m:s)
Gold medal icon.svg Atelaw Yeshetela  Belgium 29:15
Silver medal icon.svg Ayad Lamdassem  Spain 29:20
Bronze medal icon.svg José Rocha  Portugal 29:21
4 Hassan Chahdi  France 29:22
5 Joseph Sweeney  Ireland 29:23
6 Javier Guerra  Spain 29:24
7 Morhad Amdouni  France 29:26
8 Khalid Choukoud  Netherlands 29:27
9 Andy Vernon  Great Britain 29:39
10 Morten Toft Munkholm  Denmark 29:42
11 Mohktar Benhari  France 29:43
12 Benjamin Malaty  France 29:44
Teams
Rank Team Points
Gold medal icon.svg  France
Chahdi
Amdouni
Mokhtari
Malaty
34
Silver medal icon.svg  Great Britain
Vernon
Ryan McLeod
James Walsh
Mark Draper
59
Bronze medal icon.svg  Spain
Lamdassem
Guerra
Ricardo Serrano
Yousseff Aakaou
67
4  Portugal 76
5  Italy 84
6  Ireland 116
7  Denmark 135
8  Germany 160
  • Totals: 76 entrants, 76 starters, 73 finishers, 10 teams.[13]

Senior women[edit]

Ireland's Fionnuala Britton won the women's title.
Individual race
Rank Athlete Country Time (m:s)
Gold medal icon.svg Fionnuala Britton  Ireland 25:55
Silver medal icon.svg Ana Dulce Félix  Portugal 26:02
Bronze medal icon.svg Gemma Steel  Great Britain 26:04
4 Nadia Ejjafini  Italy 26:13
5 Adriënne Herzog  Netherlands 26:34
6 Sophie Duarte  France 26:36
7 Roxana Bârcă  Romania 26:39
8 Leonor Carneiro  Portugal 26:39
9 Simret Restle  Germany 26:40
10 Valeria Straneo  Italy 26:42
11 Christine Bardelle  France 26:50
12 Freya Murray  Great Britain 26:51
Teams
Rank Team Points
Gold medal icon.svg  Great Britain
Steel
Murray
Julia Bleasdale
Elle Baker
42
Silver medal icon.svg  Portugal
Félix
Carneiro
Anália Rosa
Ana Dias
51
Bronze medal icon.svg  Germany
Restle
Sabrina Mockenhaupt
Verena Dreier
Susanne Hahn
83
4  France 83
5  Romania 88
6  Italy 101
7  Spain 116
8  Ireland 133
  • Totals: 54 entrants, 54 starters, 49 finishers, 8 teams.[14]

Under-23 men[edit]

Individual race
Rank Athlete Country Time (m:s)
Gold medal icon.svg Florian Carvalho  France 23:44
Silver medal icon.svg James Wilkinson  Great Britain 23:47
Bronze medal icon.svg Sondre Nordstad Moen  Norway 23:48
4 Richard Ringer  Germany 23:48
5 Siarhei Platonau  Belarus 23:51
6 Abdi Nageeye  Netherlands 23:54
7 Simon Denissel  France 23:56
8 Mitch Goose  Great Britain 23:57
9 Sindre Buraas  Norway 24:02
10 Cihat Ulus  Turkey 24:03
11 Patrick Nasti  Italy 24:04
12 Jesper Van Der Wielen  Netherlands 24:04
Teams
Rank Team Points
Gold medal icon.svg  Norway
Moen
Buraas
Henrik Ingebrigtsen
Hans Kristian Fløystad
58
Silver medal icon.svg  Great Britain
Wilkinson
Goose
Derek Hawkins
Phillip Berntsen
76
Bronze medal icon.svg  France
Carvalho
Denissel
Mattheiu Garel
Bryan Cantero
94
4  Spain 97
5  Russia 107
6  Belgium 128
7  Germany 131
8  Ukraine 141
  • Totals: 99 entrants, 98 starters, 97 finishers, 15 teams.[15]

Under-23 women[edit]

Individual race
Rank Athlete Country Time (m:s)
Gold medal icon.svg Emma Pallant  Great Britain 19:57
Silver medal icon.svg Naomi Taschimowitz  Great Britain 20:02
Bronze medal icon.svg Corrina Harrer  Germany 20:03
4 Stephanie Twell  Great Britain 20:03
5 Anna Hahner  Germany 20:05
6 Viktoriya Pohoryelska  Ukraine 20:08
7 Hannah Walker  Great Britain 20:12
8 Clémence Calvin  France 20:16
9 Carla Salomé Rocha  Portugal 20:20
10 Jennifer Wenth  Austria 20:26
11 Laura Suur  Estonia 20:28
12 Lisa Hahner  Germany 20:31
Teams
Rank Team Points
Gold medal icon.svg  Great Britain
Pallant
Taschimowitz
Twell
Walker
14
Silver medal icon.svg  Germany
Harrer
A. Hanher
L. Hahner
Jana Soethout
41
Bronze medal icon.svg  Portugal
Rocha
Catarina Ribeiro
Daniela Cunha
Sónia Catarina Lima
77
4  France 99
5  Turkey 101
6  Spain 102
  • Totals: 43 entrants, 43 starters, 42 finishers, 6 teams.[16]

Junior men[edit]

Individual race
Rank Athlete Country Time (m:s)
Gold medal icon.svg Ilgizar Safiullin  Russia 17:49
Silver medal icon.svg Richard Goodman  Great Britain 17:51
Bronze medal icon.svg Vladimir Nikitin  Russia 17:51
4 Roman Collenot-Spiret  France 17:53
5 Pieter-Jan Hannes  Belgium 17:58
6 Rui Pinto  Portugal 18:01
7 Andrey Rusakov  Russia 18:07
8 Jonathan Hay  Great Britain 18:09
9 Kieren Clements  Great Britain 18:10
10 Yehor Zhukov  Ukraine 18:10
11 Niall Fleming  Great Britain 18:18
12 Daniel Arce  Spain 18:20
Teams
Rank Team Points
Gold medal icon.svg  Great Britain
Goodman
Hay
Clements
Fleming
30
Silver medal icon.svg  Russia
Safiulin
Nikitin
Rusakov
Mikhail Strelkov
60
Bronze medal icon.svg  France
Collenot-Spiret
Djilali Bedrani
Julien Detre
Francois Barrer
103
4  Ukraine 109
5  Belgium 118
6  Denmark 120
7  Germany 127
8  Spain 134
  • Totals: 114 entrants, 112 starters, 109 finishers, 19 teams.[17]

Junior women[edit]

Individual race
Rank Athlete Country Time (m:s)
Gold medal icon.svg Emelia Gorecka  Great Britain 13:13
Silver medal icon.svg Ioana Doaga  Romania 13:14
Bronze medal icon.svg Amela Terzić  Serbia 13:22
4 Gulshat Fazlitdinova  Russia 13:24
5 Zenobie Vangansbeke  Belgium 13:32
6 Annabel Gummow  Great Britain 13:34
7 Svetlana Ryazantseva  Russia 13:37
8 Esma Aydemir  Turkey 13:41
9 Gesa-Felicitas Krause  Germany 13:42
10 Maya Rehberg  Germany 13:47
11 Elena Burkard  Germany 13:50
12 Mariya Hodakyvska  Ukraine 13:51
Teams
Rank Team Points
Gold medal icon.svg  Great Britain
Gorecka
Gummow
Gemma Kersey
Katie Holt
40
Silver medal icon.svg  Russia
Fazlitdinova
Ryazantseva
Alexandra Gulyaeva
Vera Vasilyeva
43
Bronze medal icon.svg  Germany
Krause
Rehberg
Burkard
Jannika John
50
4  Romania 75
5  Netherlands 117
6  Belgium 122
7  Spain 126
8  Turkey 132
  • Totals: 93 entrants, 93 starters, 92 finishers, 16 teams.[18]

Total medal table[edit]

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Great Britain 6 5 1 12
2  France 2 0 2 4
3  Russia 1 2 1 4
4  Norway 1 0 1 2
5  Belgium 1 0 0 1
5  Ireland 1 0 0 1
7  Portugal 0 2 2 4
8  Germany 0 1 3 4
9  Spain 0 1 1 2
10  Romania 0 1 0 1
11  Serbia 0 0 1 1
Total 12 12 12 36
  • Note: Totals include both individual and team medals, with medals in the team competition counting as one medal.[19]

References[edit]

  1. ^ SENIOR MEN’S FINAL: Bekele from gun to tape. European Athletics (2011-12-11). Retrieved on 2011-12-11.
  2. ^ "Britton breezes to gold in Slovenia". RTÉ Sport. 11 December 2011. Retrieved 15 December 2011. 
  3. ^ "Fionnuala Britton wins gold in European cross-country championship". Irish Independent. 11 December 2011. Retrieved 15 December 2011. 
  4. ^ SENIOR WOMEN'S FINAL: Fabulous Fionnuala. European Athletics (2011-12-11). Retrieved on 2011-12-11.
  5. ^ Albufeira (POR) & Velenje (SLO) to host the SPAR European Cross Country Championships in 2010 & 2011. European Athletics (2007). Retrieved on 2011-12-08.
  6. ^ Ligi the mole unveiled as SPAR European Cross Country Championships mascot. European Athletics (2011-07-10). Retrieved on 2011-12-08.
  7. ^ European Athletics to stream live SPAR European Cross Country Championships. European Athletics (2011-12-05). Retrieved on 2011-12-08.
  8. ^ Timetable EXCCH Velenje 2011. Velenje 2011 (2011-11-21). Retrieved on 2011-12-08.
  9. ^ Competition Venue. Velenje 2011. Retrieved on 2011-12-08.
  10. ^ Calendar 2012 - Cross Country. European Athletics (2011). Retrieved on 2011-12-08.
  11. ^ Ramsak, Bob (2011-12-09). Lebid looking to add to his continental legend in Velenje - European XC champs preview. IAAF. Retrieved on 2011-12-10.
  12. ^ Senior women's preview: Who will succeed Augusto in Velenje?. European Athletics (2011-12-07). Retrieved on 2011-12-08.
  13. ^ 2011 European XC Championships - Senior Men's Final. European Athletics (2011). Retrieved on 2011-12-11.
  14. ^ 2011 European XC Championships - Senior Women's Final. European Athletics (2011). Retrieved on 2011-12-11.
  15. ^ 2011 European XC Championships - Under-23 Men's Final. European Athletics (2011). Retrieved on 2011-12-11.
  16. ^ 2011 European XC Championships - Under-23 women's Final. European Athletics (2011). Retrieved on 2011-12-11.
  17. ^ 2011 European XC Championships - Junior men's Final. European Athletics (2011). Retrieved on 2011-12-11.
  18. ^ 2011 European XC Championships - Junior women's Final. European Athletics (2011). Retrieved on 2011-12-11.
  19. ^ Medal Table. European Athletics (2011). Retrieved on 2011-12-11.

External links[edit]