69th Air Division

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69th Air Division
Active 1943–1945, 1947–1949
Country United States
Branch United States Army Air Forces
United States Air Force
Role Fighter/Bombardment/Troop Carrier
Engagements
World War II Victory Medal ribbon.svg Asiatic-Pacific Campaign ribbon.svg
  • World War II
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign (1943–1945)
Commanders
Notable
commanders
Brigadier General John C. Kennedy

The 69th Air Division (69th AD) is an inactive United States Air Force organization. Its last assignment was with Tactical Air Command, assigned to Ninth Air Force, being stationed at Greater Pittsburgh Airport, Pennsylvania. It was inactivated on 24 June 1949.

Activated in China in 1943, the wing engaged in sea sweeps and attacks against Japanese inland shipping. Between late 1943 and 1945 its units bombed and strafed such targets as trains, harbors, railroads in French Indochina, and the Canton Hong Kong area of South China. These units also provided air support to Chinese ground troops. Fighter aircraft defended Allied air bases, the eastern terminus of The Hump air bridge, and the bases in the area of Kunming and attacked bridges, oil and gas storage facilities, supply dumps, convoys, and enemy troop concentrations. After the Japanese surrender, the 69th's troop carrier aircraft ferried troops and supplies in China, helped to evacuate prisoners of war, and flew mercy missions in China, French Indochina, and Manchuria.

It activated in the Reserves in 1947 and performed training duties until June 1949.

History[edit]

Lineage[edit]

  • Established as 69 Bombardment Wing on 9 August 1943
Activated on 3 September 1943
Redesignated 69 Composite Wing on 21 December 1943
Inactivated on 26 December 1945
  • Redesignated 69 Troop Carrier Wing on 28 January 1947
Activated in the Reserve on 23 March 1947
Redesignated 69 Air Division, Troop Carrier on 16 April 1948
Inactivated on 27 June 1949
Redesignated 69 Air Division on 1 September 1959 (Remained Inactive)

Assignments[edit]

Stations[edit]

Components[edit]

See also[edit]


References[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

  • Maurer, Maurer (1983). Air Force Combat Units Of World War II. Maxwell AFB, Alabama: Office of Air Force History. ISBN 0-89201-092-4.