Ankang Wulipu Airport

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Ankang Wulipu Airport
安康五里铺机场
Ānkāng Wǔlǐpù Jīchǎng
IATA: AKAICAO: ZLAK
Summary
Airport type Public
Operator Ankang Airport Co. Ltd.
Location Ankang, Shaanxi, China
Elevation AMSL 262 m / 860 ft
Coordinates 32°42′29″N 108°55′52″E / 32.70806°N 108.93111°E / 32.70806; 108.93111Coordinates: 32°42′29″N 108°55′52″E / 32.70806°N 108.93111°E / 32.70806; 108.93111
Website www.cwag-ak.com
Map
AKA is located in China
AKA
AKA
Location of airport in China
Runways
Direction Length Surface
m ft
11/29 1,600 5,249 Concrete
Source: [1]

Ankang Wulipu Airport (Chinese: 安康五里铺机场) (IATA: AKAICAO: ZLAK) is an airport serving the city of Ankang in Shaanxi Province, China. It is located the town of Wuli in Hanbin District, 9 kilometers from the city center.[1]

Facilities[edit]

The airport has one runway that is 1,600 meters long and 30 meters wide (class 3C), and a 1,200 square-meter terminal building.[1]

History[edit]

The airport was first built in 1938 for military use and expanded in 1945.[1] During World War II, the airport was known as Ankang Airfield and was used by the United States Army Air Forces Fourteenth Air Force as part of the China Defensive Campaign. The Americans flew photo-reconnaissance aircraft from the airport over Japanese-held territory on intelligence gathering combat missions between April and August 1945. In addition, P-61 Black Widow night interceptor aircraft provided protection against night Japanese bomber and fighter attacks from April until the end of the war in September. The Americans closed their facilities at the airport in early October 1945.[2]

Civil flights first started in the 1964 but ceased in 1986. The airport was expanded to its current size in 1993 and served civil flights again from 1995 until July 2001, when the opening of the Xian-Ankang Railway forced the airport to close again. Flights resumed for the third time in April 2006.[1]

Airport and Destination[edit]

Airlines Destinations
Grand China Air Xi'an

See also[edit]

References[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

  1. ^ a b c d e 机场简介
  2. ^ Maurer, Maurer. Air Force Combat Units Of World War II. Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama: Office of Air Force History, 1983. ISBN 0-89201-092-4

External links[edit]