Aeolic order

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Aeolic column, now in the Bardo National Museum, Tunis.

The Aeolic order or Aeolian order was an early order of Classical architecture.

The form developed in northwestern Asia Minor, but is also seen in some temples in Sicily and ancient Palestine, and is named for the Aeolian Islands.[1] It has a strong similarity to the better known Ionic order, but differs in the capital, where a palmette is placed between the two volutes. Many examples also show simplified details compared to the Ionic.

The earliest surviving examples of the Aeolic order are contemporary with the emergence of the Ionic and Doric orders in the 6th century BC, but some authorities have suggested that the Ionic style represents a development of the Aeolic.

The Aeolic order fell out of use at the end of the Archaic Period.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Philip P. Betancourt. The Aeolic Style in Architecture: A Survey of its Development in Palestine, the Halikarnassos Peninsula, and Greece, 1000-500 B.C (Princeton University Press) 1977.

References[edit]