Alter ego

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For other uses, see Alter ego (disambiguation).
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An alter ego (Latin, "the other I") is a second self, which is believed to be distinct from a person's normal or original personality. A person who has an alter ego is said to lead a double life. The term appeared in common usage in the early 19th century when dissociative identity disorder was first described by psychologists.[1] Cicero was the first to coin the term as part of his philosophical construct in 1st century Rome, but he described it as "a second self, a trusted friend".[2]

A distinct meaning of alter ego can be found in literary analysis, wherein it describes characters in different works who are psychologically similar, or a fictional character whose behavior, speech or thoughts intentionally represent those of the author. It's also used to design the best friend of another character in a story. Similarly, the term alter ego may be applied to the role or persona taken on by an actor[3] or by other types of performers.

The existence of "another self" was first recognized in the 1730s. Anton Mesmer used hypnosis to separate the alter ego. These experiments showed a behavior pattern that was distinct from the personality of the individual when he was in the waking state compared to when he was under hypnosis. Another character had developed in the altered state of consciousness but in the same body.[4]

Alter ego is also used to refer to the different behaviors any person may display in certain situations. Related concepts include avatar, doppelgänger, impersonator, and Dissociative identity disorder (DID).

In literature[edit]

Superman and his alter ego, Clark Kent

The title characters in Robert Louis Stevenson's thriller Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde represent an exploration of the concept that good and evil exist within one person, constantly at war. Edward Hyde literally represents the doctor's other self, a psychopath who is unrestrained by the conventions of civilized society, and who shares a body with the doctor. The names "Jekyll and Hyde" have since become synonymous with a split personality or an alter ego that becomes capable of overpowering the original self.

In Pre-Crisis comic books, superheroes and their secret identities are often considered alter egos. The archetypal comic book hero, Superman, assumes the identity of the "mild-mannered" newspaper reporter Clark Kent in order to live among the citizens of Metropolis without arousing suspicion. Whereas Clark Kent's true self is Superman (or rather the Kryptonian Kal-El), Batman is a character created by Bruce Wayne in order to disguise himself for the purposes of fighting crime. However, there has been suggestions that Bruce Wayne is the mask that the true self, Batman, wears, in the episode "Dreams in Darkness" in Batman: The Animated Series. The Batman comics and movies such as Batman Begins have also explored the theme of the true self (Wayne) becoming lost in or giving himself over to the alter ego, much like the plot of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde. Post-Crisis comics flip this idea around for both superheroes. Superman becomes the persona that Clark Kent adopts in order to freely use his gifts to help the world without jeopardizing his friends, family and personal life. Conversely, carefree playboy billionaire Bruce Wayne becomes the alter ego necessary to hide the true persona of the crime-fighting Batman. The Incredible Hulk comic book series further complicates this theme, as Bruce Banner loses control to the Hyde-like Hulk whenever he becomes angry, yet also depends upon the Hulk's super powers in order to combat villains. Also the Batman villain Two-Face seems to split his alter-ego from Harvey Dent, whose personality changes from being judge-like to changing back to his Two-Face persona and being ruthless using his two-faced coin to determine life and death.

Comic book-inspired alter egos can be seen in other forms of popular fiction, including television and movie adaptations of comic books, parodies of this genre, and unrelated fictions such as Star Wars or Angel.

In film and TV[edit]

Alter egos are frequently found in film. Some examples include:

In "Beyblade" original Hiro granger has an alter ego; Jin of the Gale, Hurricane Jin

In the Our Gang short Mama's Little Pirate, after Spanky gets in trouble for touching his dad's flashlight he gets sent to his bedroom and he talks to his alter ego.

In Youth in Revolt, the protagonist Nick Twisp, played by Michael Cera, is a shy, socially inept teenager who is hopelessly in love with Sheeni Saunders. Twisp then creates an alter ego to help him win her love.

In Bleach, main character Ichigo Kurosaki is confronted by his darker alter ego, Hollow Ichigo, and the two fight for control of Ichigo's body.

In Black Swan, the protagonist Nina Sayers, played by Natalie Portman, faces her alter ego represented by the character of the Black Swan.

In Breaking Bad, the protagonist Walter White, a high school chemistry teacher, slowly forfeits himself to his alter ego, Heisenberg, to survive the drug dealing world.

In 400 Blows, main character Antoine Doinel is the alter ego of the director, François Truffaut.

In Paprika Anime Film, main character Paprika is the alter ego of the Dr. Atsuko Chiba.

In The Double Life of Véronique, by Krzysztof Kieślowski two young women born on the same day, Véronique and Weronika, live a mysteriously interconnected life, one in Paris and the other one in Poland with the vague and rarely expressed feeling that they are "not alone".

In David Fincher's Fight Club (based on the book by Chuck Palahniuk), the nameless protagonist has Tyler Durden as his alter ego.

In Code Geass, protagonist and anti-hero Lelouch Lamperouge creates an alter ego, Zero, in his plans of conquering the Holy Britannian Empire.

In South Park, lovable Butters Stotch has an evil super villain alter ego, Professor Chaos, whom he created out of frustration and hate for everyone.

In How I Met Your Mother, Robin Scherbatsky had a teenage alter ego as a teenage popstar in Canada. Her alter ego as Robin Sparkles also morphed into a darker, grungy alter ego called Robin Daggers when she was stalking "Paul Schaffer".

In Jem and the Holograms, the heroine Jem is the popstar alter ego of Jerrica Benton throughout the Series".

In Pretty Little Liars (TV series) , Alison DiLaurentis used her alter ego, Vivian Darkbloom, to spy on a mysterious person who is fond of threatening and torturing her.

In "Phineas and Ferb", their pet platypus, "Perry the Platypus", uses his alter ego as a secret agent to stop "Dr. Heinz Doofenshmirtz".

In Wilfred (particularly the U.S. version), the title character of Wilfred is eventually revealed to be the alter ego of the main character Ryan, played by Elijah Wood.

In "Beavis and Butthead", Beavis becomes "The Great Cornholio" after consuming large amounts of caffeine and/or sugar.

In "The League Of Gentlemen" (TV series) Papa Lazarou becomes " Keith Drop " after using makeup tips from his many wives to effect a very convincing transformation this was an attempt for him to gain more wives he eventually gets rumbled when Brian Morgan Played By Mark Gatiss finds his wife's Katy Morgan's brooch amongst the donations that she was wearing on the day she Mysteriously vanished Keith tries to ward Brian away from the subject and attempts to kill him Reenie carver Played by Steve Pemberton hits him over the head and restrains him he manages to escape and when they follow him he imprisons them in his circus animals cages when Brian breaks into Papa's house he realizes that Keith was a real person whose identity Papa assumed however the fate of the real Keith was never revealed played by Reece Shearsmith

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Irving B. Weiner, Donald K. Freedheim (2003). Handbook of Psychology. John Wiley and Sons. p. 262. ISBN 0-471-17669-9. 
  2. ^ "Alter Ego". Collins English Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 10th Edition. William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 2009. Retrieved 13 January 2013. 
  3. ^ Glenn Daniel Wilson (1991). Psychology and Performing Arts. Taylor & Francis. ISBN 90-265-1119-1. 
  4. ^ Pedersen, David (1994). Cameral Analysis: A Method of Treating the Psychoneuroses Using Hypnosis. London, U.K.: Routledge. p. 20. ISBN 0-415-10424-6.