Arnold Savage

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For his son Arnold (c.1382–1420), also an MP, see Arnold Savage II.

Sir Arnold Savage of Bobbing, Kent (8 September 1358 – 1410) was the English Speaker of the House of Commons from 1400 to 1402 and then again from 1403 to 1404 and a Knight of the Shire of Kent who was referred to as "the great comprehensive symbol of the English people".[1] (perhaps because, like a lot of people in England, he was sued for debt by London traders [2] )

He was born in Bobbing, Kent, the son and heir of Sir Arnold Savage. Who died in 1374.[3]

He was appointed Sheriff of Kent for 1382 and 1386 and knighted in 1385. He was elected knight of the shire (MP) for Kent in 1390, 1391, 1401, 1402 and 1404, being elected speaker twice. He was constable of Queenborough castle from 1393 to 1396 and deputy constable of Dover castle. He was a member of the council of Henry IV from 1402 to 1406.[4]

On his death in 1410 he was buried at Bobbing church. He had married Joan Echyngham, daughter of William Echyngham. He was succeeded by his son, also Arnold, who was also an MP for Kent. Their daughter Elizabeth Savage (died 1451) married Reynold Cobham, 4th Baron Cobham.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Speaker of the House of Commons", John Lane Publishing. 1911
  2. ^ Plea Rolls of the Court of Common Pleas; National Archives; CP 40/555; http://aalt.law.uh.edu/H4/CP40no555/bCP40no555dorses/IMG_0352.htm; first entry; being sued for a debt of £20/17/5 to 2 London drapers in 1399
  3. ^ Hasted, Edward (1798). "Parishes". The History and Topographical Survey of the County of Kent (Institute of Historical Research) 6: 143–150. Retrieved 3 March 2014. 
  4. ^ "SAVAGE, Sir Arnold I (1358-1410), of Bobbing, Kent.". History of Parliament. Retrieved 2012-04-14. 
Political offices
Parliament of England
Preceded by
John Doreward
Speaker of the House of Commons
1400-1402
Succeeded by
Sir Henry Redford
Preceded by
Sir Henry Redford
Speaker of the House of Commons
1403-1404
Succeeded by
Sir William Esturmy