Australian Geographic

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Australian Geographic
Australian Geographic issue 102 cover.jpg
Frequency Bimonthly
Founder Dick Smith
Year founded 1986
Company Bauer Media Group
Country Australia
Website australiangeographic.com.au

The Australian Geographic is a bi-monthly geographical magazine-style journal created by Dick Smith in 1986. It focuses mainly on stories about Australia, or about Australian people in other countries. The six editions published each year are available by subscription and on newsstands.

The magazine is known for the poster or sheet map included in each edition, as well as the high-quality photographs, the excellent maps from award-winning cartographers and the detailed technical illustrations. The 10th anniversary edition featured one of the country's most comprehensive maps of exploration ever produced. These maps have been used by explorers crossing Central Australia and Antarctica.

Australian Geographic has a comprehensive website which includes the entire magazine digital archive.[1]

It was published by Australian Geographic, a privately owned organisation that also managed a chain of retail stores similarly named in Australia.[2] Each year, a portion of the profits is given to the Australian Geographic Society,[3] the non-profit arm of Australian Geographic which supports scientific research as well as environmental and community projects. Funds are also used to highlight and support Australian adventurers and produce related diaries, calendars and books. There are also 70 Australian Geographic retail stores which sell products including Australiana, weather stations, telescopes, books and toys, these are now owned and run separately to the magazine publication.

History[edit]

The publication's offices were originally based in Terrey Hills north of Sydney. Smith was advised to include his name on the cover to aid the journal's establishment. After two years he removed his name from the cover. Smith wanted the publication to focus on accuracy by exclusively including articles that were peer-reviewed. In 1995, when subscriptions totalled more than 200,000, the publication was sold to Fairfax.

From September 2000 to December 2001, Australian Geographic published a bimonthly science and technology magazine known as Newton Graphic Science. There were, however, only eight issues published before the magazine went permanently out of print. In 2001 the journal's offices were threatened by fires during the Black Christmas bushfires.

ACP Magazines (now Bauer Media Group) purchased Australian Geographic in 2006; today the journal is based at Park Street Sydney. Dick Smith no longer has direct editorial control over content found in the journal, but remains as chairman of trustees of the Australian Geographic Society. The current editor-in-chief of Australian Geographic is Chrissie Goldrick, while the editor is John Pickrell.

Awards[edit]

The Australian Geographic Society Adventure Award is Australia's longest-running award for adventure. It has been in operation since 1987, and is bestowed upon Australia's most respected adventurers. The award is judged on merit; therefore, not all of the categories are awarded annually. The society bestows awards as a celebration of achievement and not as a competition, as such.[4] The award is given in two categories – Adventurer of the Year, and Young Adventurer of the Year.

Adventurer of the Year[edit]

Year Awardee Achievement
2013 Tim Jarvis Leading the re-enactment expedition of Shackleton's epic 1916 journey.
2012 Pat Farmer Marathon running from the North to the South poles
2010 Linda Beilharz First Australian woman to walk to the North and South poles.
2009 Andrew Lock Mountaineer who successfully climbed all fourteen of the tallest +8000m peaks in the world.
2008 Jozef Truban Trekked 3100 km across the Carpathian Mountains in 2007.
2007 Lloyd Godson Survived in a self-contained underwater habitat "the BioSUB" for 12 days.
2006 Tim Cope Travelled by horse from Mongolia to Hungary on the trail of nomads during 2004–2007.
2005 Andrew McAuley Paddled across the Gulf of Carpentaria in 2004 in a kayak.
2004 Jon Johanson First solo flight over the South Pole in a single-engine home-built aircraft.
2003 Sue Fear First Australian-born woman to climb Mount Everest.
2002 Jon Muir First ever unassisted crossing of Australia in 128 days, from Port Augusta to Burketown.
2001 Tammy van Wisse First person to swim the entire length of the Murray River in Australia.
2000 Dick Smith Flew a balloon across the Tasman Sea from New Zealand to Australia.
1999 David Mason Walked solo across Australia from Byron Bay to Steep Point in 1998.
1998 David Lewis Completed the world's first circumnavigation of the planet in multi-hull vessel.
1997 Syd Kirkby First man to venture into the Prince Charles Mountains in Antarctica with sled dogs during 1956–57.
1996 Don & Margie McIntyre Married couple who spent a year living in a tent in Antarctica.
1995 Denis Bartell Walked across Australia in 1984, and became the first person to walk walk solo across the width of the Simpson Desert.
1994 Len Beadell Completed the Woomera town survey, and supervised the construction of +6500 km of roads in outback Australia.
1993 Warwick Deacock Organised the first Australian climbing expedition of Annapurna III in the Himalayas during 1980.
1992 Ron and Valerie Taylor Became the first people to film Great White Sharks underwater in 1992 without the protection of a cage.
1991 Warren Bonython Walked across the Simpson Desert in 1973, and largely contributed to the formation of the Heysen Trail.
1990 Hans Tholstrup First maritime circumnavigation of Australia in an open boat, and first to cross Australia in a solar powered car.
1989 Dot Butler Conservationalist, mountaineer, explorer, and long distance cyclist.
1988 Philip Law Scientist and Antarctic explorer.
1987 Colin Putt Antarctic explorer and mountaineer. Amongst the first to summit Big Ben on Heard Island (Australia's Tallest Mountain).

2010 – Linda Beilharz[edit]

In 2004, Linda Beilharz became the first Australian woman to ski from the edge of Antarctica to the South Pole. Inspired by the journey, she committed herself to walk across the world's four largest icecaps in the Antarctic, the Arctic, Greenland and Patagonia.[5][6]

In 2007, Beilharz successfully crossed the Greenland Icecap. In 2011, Beilharz walked over 780 km on a 55-day journey from Ward Hunt Island in northern Canada to the North Pole. Beilharz is the first Australian woman to trek to the pole and the first female to reach both poles on foot.[5][6]

2009 – Andrew Lock[edit]

Andrew Lock became the first Australian to summit all fourteen of the world's highest peaks on 2 October 2009, after ascending Mount Shishapangma in Tibet. It took Lock sixteen years to complete his quest to climb all of the world's +8000m mountains, a feat that only seventeen other people have completed before him.[7]

2008 – Jozef Truban[edit]

Truban began his 3100 km trek across the length of the Carpathian Mountains in July 2007.[8] The Carpathian's rise and stretch in a jagged arc across central and eastern Europe, taking in Slovakia, the Czech Republic, the Ukraine, Romania and Poland. The High Tatras are the highest peaks in the Carpathians and the most technically difficult to climb, the eleven peaks above 2500m. In total, Truban rode 2600 km and walked 500 km.[8]

2007 – Lloyd Godson[edit]

Lloyd Godson is a marine biologist who survived in a self-contained underwater habitat "the BioSUB" for twelve days. The habitat was submerged in a dam in Albury, and sustained by a system which generated oxygen powered by a bicycle attached to a generator while he was underwater.[9] In doing so, he became the first person to do so using a plant-based life-support system underwater. The system was developed by some high school students in the United States, who flew to Australia to witness the endeavour.[10]

2006 – Tim Cope[edit]

Main article: Tim Cope

Tim Cope travelled by horse from Mongolia to Hungary during 2004–2007 on the trail of nomads, a path most famously laid down by Genghis Khan and the Mongols in the 13th century.[11] The journey was approximately 10,000 km long, and took him 18 months to complete on horseback.[12]

Cope also cycled a distance of 10,000 km across Russia, Siberia, Mongolia, and China in 1999;[13] and paddled a wooden canoe along the length of the Yenisey River across Russia in 2001.[14]

2005 – Andrew McAuley[edit]

Main article: Andrew McAuley

McAuley paddled across the Gulf of Carpentaria in 2004, an open ocean crossing of 530 km which he completed in 6.5 days.[15] McAuley also crossed the Bass Strait three times, including the first ever direct non-stop crossing in 2003 from Wilsons Promontory to Wynyard in 35 hours (a distance of 220 km).[16] In 2006, McAuley also led a team of Australia's leading sea kayakers on an expedition south from Hope Bay to the Antarctic Peninsula, paddling over 800 km to the Antarctic Circle.[15]

In 2007, McAuley attempted to cross the Tasman Sea from Tasmania to New Zealand. He was lost at sea and presumed dead when on 12 February, the search for his missing body was called off following the recovery of his partly flooded kayak on 10 February near Milford Sound.[17]

2004 – Jon Johanson[edit]

Main article: Jon Johanson

Johanson made the first solo flight over the South Pole in a single-engine home-built aircraft – the Van's Aircraft RV-4.

In 2004 Johanson was also awarded the FAI Gold Air Medal by the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale.[18]

2003 – Sue Fear[edit]

Main article: Sue Fear

In 2003, Fear climbed Everest (8,848 m) from the more difficult Tibetan side on the North Col. She was the first Australian-born woman and the second Australian woman overall to do so. Fear died on 28 May 2006, when she fell into a crevasse whilst descending from the summit of Manaslu in Nepal.

2002 – Jon Muir[edit]

Main article: Jon Muir

Jon Muir completed the first ever unassisted crossing of Australia in 2001, having walked a distance of 2500 km from Port Augusta to Burketown in 128 days.[19] Muir has also summitted Mount Everest in 1988, and has walked to both the south (1999) and north (2002) poles.[19]

He is also the recipient of the Order of Australia medal in 1989, and the Centenary Medal in 2003.[20]

2001 – Tammy van Wisse[edit]

Main article: Tammy van Wisse

On 18 February 2001, van Wisse became the first person to swim the entire length of the Murray River from the alps to the ocean. Starting from Corryong in Victoria's high country, it took van Wisse 106 days to reach the Murray Mouth in South Australia, a distance of 2438 km.[21]

2000 – Dick Smith[edit]

In 2000, Dick Smith made a trans-tasman balloon trip from New Zealand to Australia.[22]

1999 – David Mason[edit]

In 1998, David Mason walked from Byron Bay to Dalby, where he picked up three camels that would carry his supplies. From there, he walked through the Simpson Desert to Uluru, then across the Gibson Desert to Steep Point.[23] He completed the walk in 236 days, whilst raising money for the Fred Hollows Foundation.

1998 – David Lewis[edit]

Main article: David Henry Lewis

David Lewis was named the Australian Geographic's Explorer of the Year in 1998 in recognition of a lifetime of adventurous pursuit. He was the first person to circumnavigate the globe in a multi-hull vessel, sailed to Antarctica, and made multiple attempts to circumnavigate Antarctica.[24]

In recognition of his achievements, he was bestowed with the title of Distinguished Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit.[25]

1997 – Syd Kirkby[edit]

Main article: Sydney L. Kirkby

Kirkby was awarded the title of 1997 Adventurer of the Year for a lifetime of exploration in the Antarctic Territory. Kirkby's many accomplishments in Antarctica include establishment of the easternmost, westernmost, and southernmost astrofixes in Australian Antarctic Territory; and becoming the first man to venture into the Prince Charles Mountains with sled dogs during 1956–57. Between 1961 and 1965, he surveyed more Antarctic territory than any other explorer.[26]

Many geographical features in Antarctica have been named after Kirkby, and he was awarded the Polar Medal in 1957. He was made a Member of the Order of the British Empire in 1965, and nominated in 1999 by The Australian newspaper as one of the ten greatest Australian adventurers of the 20th century.

1996 – Don & Margie McIntyre[edit]

In 1995, Don and Margie McIntyre spent a year living at the windiest place on earth – Commonwealth Bay, Antarctica.[27] They are active supporters of the right-to-die concept, to prevent governments from restricting adventurers from risking their lives due to the costs associated with mounting rescues in remote regions such as Antarctica.[27]

1995 – Denis Bartell[edit]

Denis Bartell became the first person to walk across the Simpson Desert unassisted in 1984, whilst walking across Australia from the Gulf of Carpentaria to Gulf St Vincent.[28] He followed the 'French Line' – a route taken by the CGG surveyor Roy Elkins 21 years prior who also completed the walk but with the assistance of a support crew.[29]

1994 – Len Beadell[edit]

Main article: Len Beadell

Len Beadell was, as a surveyor in the Australian Army, responsible for the initial Woomera town survey and identification of rocket launch sites in the Australian outback. He led a group of road-makers to create over 6,500 kilometres of access roads for scientific observations of various weapons tests, the most infamous of these roads being the Gunbarrel Highway which runs from the Stuart Highway west to Carnegie Station – a distance of 1500 kilometres.[30][31]

Beadell was also awarded the British Empire Medal in 1958, and the Order of Australia in 1988, amongst other awards.

1993 – Warwick Deacock[edit]

Warwick Deacock organised the first Australian climbing expedition of Annapurna III in the Himalayas in 1980. It was the third expedition to ever be mounted to summit the mountain – the first by the Italians in 1977 which was successful, and the second in 1979 by the Germans which was unsuccessful.[32][33]

Deacock was the first Director of Outward Bound Australia, and ran an adventure travel firm for 30 years with his wife Antonia Deacock in Australia.[34]

1992 – Ron & Valerie Taylor[edit]

Main article: Ron & Valerie Taylor

Ron and Valerie Taylor are multi-award winning filmmakers from Australia who specialize in producing underwater films to promote conservation. In 1992 they became the first people to film Great White Sharks underwater without the protection of a cage, whilst testing an electronic shark repelling barrier in South Africa.[35][36]

1991 – Warren Bonython[edit]

Main article: Warren Bonython

Warren Bonython is an Australian conservationist, explorer, author and chemical engineer. He is perhaps best known for his role working towards the promotion, planning and eventual creation of the Heysen Trail; and conservation efforts of the arid landscapes of South Australia.[37][38]

On 26 January 1980, he was honoured as an Officer of the Order of Australia in recognition of service to conservation.[39]

1990 – Hans Tholstrup[edit]

Tholstrup was the first person to circumnavigate the Australian continent in a 4.9 meter (16 ft) open boat. He also devised the concept of the World Solar Challenge, and became the first person to make a transcontinental journey across Australia in a solar powered car.

1989 – Dot Butler[edit]

Dorothy (Dot) Butler was a conservationist known as the 'barefoot bushwalker', and often walked long distances at speed in the largely untracked and unmapped Blue Mountains. She was among the first to climb Crater Bluff – the highest peak in the Warrumbungles in 1936; cycled from Sydney to Melbourne during the 1940s; climbed several peaks in New Zealand; led the first Australian climbing expedition to the Andes in 1969; and cycled throughout Europe and Cambodia.[40]

1988 – Phillip Law[edit]

Main article: Phillip Law

Law was an Australian scientist and explorer, and director of Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions from 1949 to 1966. He established bases in Mawson Station, Davis Station and Casey Station. He led expeditions that explored more than 5,000 kilometres (3,100 mi) of coastline and some 1,000,000 square kilometres (390,000 sq mi) of territory in Antarctica.

Law was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1961, was appointed an Officer of the Order of Australia in 1975, a Companion of the Order of Australia in 1995, and was awarded the Centenary Medal in 2001.

1987 – Colin Putt[edit]

Putt is an explorer and mountaineer who participated in several expeditions to Antarctica, led an expedition to the Carstensz Pyramid of New Guinea, and was amongst the first to summit Big Ben on Heard Island (Australia's highest mountain). He was also one of the founding members of the Oceanic Research Foundation.[41]

Young Adventurer of the Year[edit]

Year Awardee Achievement
2010 Jessica Watson
2009 Angus Paradice Paradice completed two challenging horse races in Mongolia at the age of 13.
2008i James Castrission Completed the world's first Trans-Tasman kayak expedition from Australia to New Zealand with Justin Jones.
2008ii Justin Jones Completed the world's first Trans-Tasman kayak expedition from Australia to New Zealand with James Castrission.
2007 Rex Pemberton Third youngest person in the world to climb the seven summits.
2006i Stephen Fordyce Completed a mid-winter traverse of the Western Arthurs range in Southwest Tasmania with Roger Chao.
2006ii Roger Chao Completed a mid-winter traverse of the Western Arthurs range in Southwest Tasmania with Stephen Fordyce.
2005 Rex Pemberton Youngest Australian to ever climb Mount Everest at the age of 21.
2004i Chris Bray Walked from Port Davey to Strahan around 300 km of coastline with Jasper Timm.
2004ii Jasper Timm Walked from Port Davey to Strahan around 300 km of coastline with Chris Bray.
2003 Christopher Harris Youngest person to attempt Mount Everest.
2002 Tim Cope Cycled across Russia, Siberia, Mongolia, and China in 1999; and paddled the length of the Yenisey River in 2001.
2001i Jeremy Richardson unknown
2001ii Jarlath Weingott unknown
2001iii Angus Weingott unknown
2000 Krista Bernard Cycled solo from Indonesia to England in 2000.
1999 not conferred not conferred
1998 Chris Hatherly Hatherly rode a bike around Australia in 11.5 months during 1996.
1997 David Dicks unknown
1996i Mark Shearer unknown
1996ii Eric Croker unknown
1995 not conferred unknown
1994i Damon Howes Spent a year near the Wanderer River on the South West coast of Tasmania with Deanne Howes.
1994ii Deanne Howes Spent a year near the Wanderer River on the South West coast of Tasmania with Damon Howes.
1993 not conferred not conferred
1992i James Woodford unknown
1992ii Adam Kerezsy unknown
1991 Jeremy Durbin unknown
1990 John Weir unknown
1989 Richard Wood unknown

2009 – Angus Paradice[edit]

Paradice took part in a 10 km race for two year old horses and the 15 km race for 5yr old horses in Mongolia in 2008.[42][43]

2008 – James Castrission & Justin Jones[edit]

Castrission and Jones completed the world's first Trans-Tasman kayak expedition from Australia to New Zealand on 13 January 2008. They departed from Forster in New South Wales, and arrived in New Plymouth on New Zealand's North Island 62 days later.[44][45]

2007 – Rex Pemberton[edit]

Main article: Rex Pemberton

Pemberton climbed the Seven Summits within two years, and is the youngest person to summit Mount Everest at the age of 21.[46][47][48] He was inspired by Jesse Martin, who did a solo sail around the world.

This is the second time Pemberton was awarded the Young Adventurer of the Year award, having been recognised for his successful summit of Mount Everest in 2005.

2006 – Stephen Fordyce and Roger Chao[edit]

Stephen Fordyce and Roger Chao completed a mid-winter traverse of the Western Arthurs range in south-west Tasmania.[49]

2005 – Rex Pemberton[edit]

Main article: Rex Pemberton

In 2005, Pemberton became the youngest person to successfully summit Mount Everest at the age of 21.[46]

1990 – Tim Macartney-Snape[edit]

Main article: Tim Macartney-Snape

On 11 May 1990, Macartney-Snape made the first climb from sea level to the summit of Mount Everest. On the summit he unfurled the flag of the Australian Geographic Society, his sponsor, and that of the Foundation for Humanity’s Adulthood (now named the World Transformation Movement).[50]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Australian Geographic Online.
  2. ^ Australian Geographic Shop
  3. ^ Australian Geographic Society
  4. ^ AG. "AG Society Adventure Awards". Australian Geographic. Retrieved 19 September 2011. 
  5. ^ a b "Adventurer of the Year Awardee: Linda Beilharz". 6 October 2010. Retrieved 5 September 2011. 
  6. ^ a b "First Aussie woman Linda Beilharz successfully treks both poles". 7 May 2010. Retrieved 5 September 2011. 
  7. ^ "Adventurer of the Year Awardee: Andrew Lock". 14 October 2009. Retrieved 3 July 2011. 
  8. ^ a b "A walk in the Clouds". 6 December 2008. Retrieved 3 July 2011. 
  9. ^ "Creature Features – Llyod Godson". 2011. Retrieved 3 July 2011. 
  10. ^ "Underwater man lives his dream". 15 June 2009. Retrieved 3 July 2011. 
  11. ^ "About Tim". 2010. Retrieved 3 July 2011. 
  12. ^ "The Expedition". 2010. Retrieved 3 July 2011. 
  13. ^ "Cycling Siberia". 2010. Retrieved 3 July 2011. 
  14. ^ "Yenisey River". 2010. Retrieved 3 July 2011. 
  15. ^ a b "Kayaking". Andrew McAuley. Archived from the original on 7 July 2011. Retrieved 3 July 2011. 
  16. ^ Oldaker, Aaron (29 November 2003). "Non-stop crossing of straight in Kayak". The Advocate. Retrieved 3 July 2011. 
  17. ^ Chandler, Jo (17 February 2007). "Andrew McAuley was not crazy or reckless but crossing the Tasman Sea in a kayak was a calculated, planned gamble he lost". The Age (Melbourne). Archived from the original on 28 June 2011. Retrieved 3 July 2011. 
  18. ^ "FAI Awards received by Jon JOHANSON (Australia)". Fédération Aéronautique Internationale. Archived from the original on 16 June 2011. Retrieved 4 July 2011. 
  19. ^ a b "Adventure Chronology – Jon Muir". 2011. Retrieved 3 July 2011. 
  20. ^ "Jon Muir". 2011. Retrieved 3 July 2011. 
  21. ^ "Profile". Archived from the original on 17 July 2011. Retrieved 3 July 2011. 
  22. ^ "Dick Smith, Australian, Electronics, Retail & Aviation Magnate". AussieTycoon. Retrieved 3 July 2011. 
  23. ^ "Archives: Getting our desert legs once more". 29 May 2011. Retrieved 3 July 2011. 
  24. ^ "Obituaries: David Lewis". The Telegraph (London). 26 November 2002. Retrieved 4 July 2011. 
  25. ^ "The man who set out to see it all". Sydney Morning Herald. 16 November 2002. Archived from the original on 23 June 2011. Retrieved 4 July 2011. 
  26. ^ "Sydney L Kirkby (1933– )". Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities. Retrieved 4 July 2011. 
  27. ^ a b "About Don and Margie McIntyre". BlueWorld Speaking. Retrieved 4 July 2011. 
  28. ^ "Desert Walker: Gulf to Gulf". National Film and Sound Archive. Retrieved 4 July 2011. 
  29. ^ "Birdsville or Bust". Simpson Desert French Line. Archived from the original on 6 July 2011. Retrieved 4 July 2011. 
  30. ^ "Beadell Biography". Beadell Tours. Retrieved 18 July 2011. 
  31. ^ "Len Beadell". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 18 July 2011. 
  32. ^ "Australian Team sets out to climb Annapurna". Australian Woman's Weekly, The. Retrieved 18 July 2011. 
  33. ^ "Spirit of Adventure". Sunshine Coast Daily. Retrieved 18 July 2011. 
  34. ^ Williams, Sally (21 April 2008). "The housewife explorers who climbed the Himalayas". London: The Telegraph. Retrieved 18 July 2011. 
  35. ^ "Ron and Valerie Taylor – Brief Biography". Ron and Valerie Taylor. Archived from the original on 15 July 2011. Retrieved 19 July 2011. 
  36. ^ "Talking Heads with Peter Thompson: Ron and Valerie Taylor". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Retrieved 19 July 2011. 
  37. ^ "Willem Kempen A Hard Trek into the Desert". Willem Kempen. Retrieved 19 July 2011. 
  38. ^ "Biographical Entry: Bonython, Charles Warren (1916 – )". Encyclopaedia of Australian Science. Retrieved 19 July 2011. 
  39. ^ "It's an Honour". Australian Government. Retrieved 19 July 2011. 
  40. ^ "Well born, the barefoot bushwalker". Sydney Morning Herald. 28 March 2008. Retrieved 22 July 2011. 
  41. ^ "ANZEC Members: Mr Colin Putt". Australia and New Zealand Explorers Club. Retrieved 22 July 2011. 
  42. ^ "2009 Young Adventurer of the Year Awardee: Angus Paradice". Australian Geographic Society. Retrieved 22 July 2011. 
  43. ^ "Teen wins award for Mongolian adventure". Sydney Morning Herald. 17 October 2009. Retrieved 22 July 2011. 
  44. ^ "Crossing the Ditch: About Us". Retrieved 25 July 2011. 
  45. ^ "First mate". Australian Geographic Society. Retrieved 25 July 2011. 
  46. ^ a b "AAPT sponsors Rex Pemberton on final two climbs". AAPT. Retrieved 4 August 2011. 
  47. ^ "Everest is not enough for Australia's Peak Performer – Rex Pemberton". Heidelberg. Retrieved 4 August 2011. 
  48. ^ "News: AG at Science in the City". Australian Geographic Society. Retrieved 4 August 2011. 
  49. ^ "Partners". Steppe by Steppe. Archived from the original on 6 July 2011. Retrieved 4 August 2011. 
  50. ^ Everest: From Sea to Summit. Australian Geographic. 1991. ISBN 978-1-86276-009-7. 
  • Australian Geographic 10th Anniversary Collectors Edition No. 40 Oct – Dec 1995

External links[edit]