BabaKiueria

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BabaKiueria
BabaKiueria title card.jpg
Directed by Don Featherstone
Produced by Julian Pringle
Screenplay by Geoffrey Atherden
Starring
Music by Peter Crosbie
Cinematography Julian Penney
Edited by Michael Honey
Release date(s) 1986
Running time 29:00
Country Australia
Language English

BabaKiueria (also known under the video-title BabaKiueria (Barbeque Area)) is a 1986 Australian satirical film on relations between Indigenous Australians and Australians of European descent.

Synopsis[edit]

The opening scene depicts a group of uniformed Indigenous Australians coming ashore in a small boat, watched by various European Australians engaged in typical beachside activities. The group from the boat approaches one of these and asks, "What do you call this place?", receiving the reply, "Er... 'Barbecue Area'."

The plot revolves around a role-reversal, whereby it is the Indigenous Australians who have invaded the land of stereotypical European Australians - the fictitious country of BabaKiueria. It presents many contemporary Aboriginal issues including white people as a minority, the unequal treatment of whites by the police, white children are taken from their families or white people being moved because the government needs their home for "something". The paternalistic policies of the BabaKiueria government are defended by Wagwan, the Minister for White Affairs (Bob Maza).

Cast[edit]

  • Michelle Torres - (Presenter)
  • Bob Maza - (Government Minister)
  • Kevin Smith - (Police Superintendent)
  • Cecily Polson - (Mother)
  • Kelan Angel - (Son)
  • Marguerita Haynes - (Daughter)
  • Garry Williams - (Explorer)
  • Soul Beliear - (Police Sergeant #1)
  • Terry Reid - (Police Sergeant #2)
  • Athol Compton - (Newsreader)
  • Kati Edwards - (Grandmother)
  • Yvonne Shipley - (Wealthy Woman)
  • Tony Barry - (Father (Mr. Smith))

Awards[edit]

The film won the 1987 United Nations Media Peace Prize.[1]

Trivia[edit]

Much of the documentary was filmed on site, including the Anzac March and the 'Ritual of Violence'.

References[edit]

External links[edit]