Bazaya

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Bāzāia or Bāzāiu, inscribed mba-za-a-a and of uncertain meaning, was the ruler of Assyria rather speculatively ca. 1649-1622 BC, the 52nd listed on the Assyrian King List, succeeding IB.TAR.Sîn, to whom he was supposedly a great-uncle. He reigned for twenty-eight years and has left no known inscriptions.[1]

Biography[edit]

The Assyrian king lists[i 1][i 2][i 3] give Bāzāiu’s five predecessors as father-son successors, although all reigned during a fifty-two period, stretching genealogical credibility. All three extant copies give his father as Bēl-bāni, the second in the sequence, whose reign had ended forty-one years earlier and who had been the great-grandfather of his immediate predecessor.[2] The literal reading of the list was challenged by Landsberger who suggested that the three preceding kings, Libaia, Šarma-Adad I and IB.TAR.Sîn, may have been Bēl-bāni's brothers.[3]

The Synchronistic Kinglist[i 4] gives his Babylonian counterpart as Pešgaldarameš of the Sealand Dynasty. He was succeeded by Lullaia, a usurper, whose brief reign was followed by that of Bāzāiu’s own son, ŠÚ-Ninua.[4]

Inscriptions[edit]

  1. ^ Khorsabad List, IM 60017 (excavation nos.: DS 828, DS 32-54), ii 20.
  2. ^ SDAS List, IM 60484, ii 18.
  3. ^ Nassouhi List, Istanbul A. 116 (Assur 8836), ii 15.
  4. ^ Synchronistic Kinglist, Ass 14616c (KAV 216), I 6’.

References[edit]

  1. ^ A. K. Grayson (1972). Assyrian Royal Inscriptions, Volume 1. Otto Harrassowitz. pp. 30–31. 
  2. ^ B. Newgrosh (1999). "The Chronology of Ancient Assyria Re-assessed". JACF 8: 79–80. 
  3. ^ J. A. Brinkman (1998). "Bēl-bāni". In K. Radner. The Prosopography of the Neo-Assyrian Empire, Volume 1, Part 2: B–G. The Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus Project. p. 288. 
  4. ^ K. Radner (1998). "Bāzāiu". The Prosopography of the Neo-Assyrian Empire, Volume 1, Part 2: B–G. The Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus Project. p. 278. 
Preceded by
IB.TAR.Sîn
King of Assyria
1649–1622 BC
Succeeded by
Lullaia