Bazaya

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Bāzāia or Bāzāiu, inscribed mba-za-a-a and of uncertain meaning, was the ruler of Assyria rather speculatively ca. 1649-1622 BC, the 52nd listed on the Assyrian King List, succeeding IB.TAR.Sîn, of whom he was supposedly his great uncle. He reigned for twenty eight years and has left no known inscriptions.[1]

Biography[edit]

The Assyrian king lists[i 1][i 2][i 3] give Bāzāiu’s five predecessors as father-son successors, although all reigned during a fifty two period, stretching genealogical credibility. All three extant copies give his father as Bēl-bāni, the second in the sequence whose reign had ended forty one years earlier and who had been the great grandfather of his immediate predecessor.[2] The literal reading of the list was challenged by Landsberger who suggested that the three preceding kings, Libaia, Šarma-Adad I and IB.TAR.Sîn, may have been Bēl-bāni's brothers.[3]

The Synchronistic Kinglist[i 4] gives his Babylonian counterpart as Pešgaldarameš of the Sealand Dynasty. He was succeeded by Lullaia, a usurper, whose brief reign was followed by that of Bāzāiu’s own son, ŠÚ-Ninua.[4]

Inscriptions[edit]

  1. ^ Khorsabad List, IM 60017 (excavation nos.: DS 828, DS 32-54), ii 20.
  2. ^ SDAS List, IM 60484, ii 18.
  3. ^ Nassouhi List, Istanbul A. 116 (Assur 8836), ii 15.
  4. ^ Synchronistic Kinglist, Ass 14616c (KAV 216), I 6’.

References[edit]

  1. ^ A. K. Grayson (1972). Assyrian Royal Inscriptions, Volume 1. Otto Harrassowitz. pp. 30–31. 
  2. ^ B. Newgrosh (1999). "The Chronology of Ancient Assyria Re-assessed". JACF 8: 79–80. 
  3. ^ J. A. Brinkman (1998). "Bēl-bāni". In K. Radner. The Prosopography of the Neo-Assyrian Empire, Volume 1, Part 2: B–G. The Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus Project. p. 288. 
  4. ^ K. Radner (1998). "Bāzāiu". The Prosopography of the Neo-Assyrian Empire, Volume 1, Part 2: B–G. The Neo-Assyrian Text Corpus Project. p. 278. 
Preceded by
IB.TAR.Sîn
King of Assyria
1649–1622 BC
Succeeded by
Lullaia