Benjamin Seaver

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For the TV sitcom character of the same name, see Growing Pains.
Benjamin Seaver
Mayor B Seaver.png
13th Mayor of Boston, Massachusetts
In office
January 5, 1852[1] – January 2, 1854[2]
Preceded by John P. Bigelow
Succeeded by Jerome V. C. Smith
President of the
Common Council
of Boston, Massachusetts[3]
In office
July 1, 1847[4] – January 7, 1850[5]
Preceded by George Stillman Hillard[4]
Succeeded by Francis Brinley[5]
Member of the
Common Council
of Boston, Massachusetts
Ward 5[6]
In office
July 6, 1845[7] – January 3, 1848[8]
Member of the
Common Council
of Boston, Massachusetts
Ward 4[6]
In office
January 3, 1848[8] – January 7, 1850[5]
Personal details
Born April 12, 1795[9]
Roxbury, Massachusetts
Died February 14, 1856(1856-02-14) (aged 60)[10]
Spouse(s) Sarah Johnson[9]
Children Benjamin Francis (1820-1868), Henry Gardner (1822-1838), Mary Elizabeth (1825-?), Charles Milton (1829-?).[10]
Alma mater Roxbury Grammar School[11]
Occupation Auctioneer[11]

Benjamin Seaver (April 12, 1795 – February 14, 1856) was an American politician, serving as the thirteenth mayor of Boston, Massachusetts from January 5, 1852 to January 2, 1854.[12]

Early life[edit]

Seaver was born in Roxbury, Massachusetts[13] In 1812 Seaver became an apprentice at the auction and commission store of whitwell & Bond.[13] In 1816 Seaver became a partner in the firm which was renames Whitwell, Bond & Co.[13]

Seaver married Sarah Johnson.[9]

Political career[edit]

City of Boston Common Council[edit]

Seaver was first elected to represent Boston's Ward 5 as a member of the Common Council in 1845. He was reelected to the Common Council from Ward 5 in 1846 and 1847. In 1848 Seaver moved to Ward 4 and was subsequently elected as a councilor from the new ward in 1848 and 1849.

In July 1847 Seaver was elected as President of the Common Council and he held that position for the two and a half years that he remained on the City of Boston Common Council.[9]

Massachusetts legislature[edit]

From 1846 to 1848 Seaver served as a member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives and in 1850 and 1851 he was elected to the Massachusetts Senate.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ A Catalogue of the City Councils of Boston (CCC Boston), 1822-1908, Roxbury, 1846-1867, Charlestown 1847-1873 and of The Selectmen of Boston, 1634-1822 also of Various Other Town and Municipal officers (printed by Order of the City Council), Boston, MA: City of Boston Printing Department, 1909, p. 242 
  2. ^ CCC Boston, 1822-1908, p. 244.
  3. ^ CCC Boston, 1822-1908, pp. 237-240.
  4. ^ a b CCC Boston, 1822-1908, p. 237.
  5. ^ a b c CCC Boston, 1822-1908, p. 240.
  6. ^ a b CCC Boston, 1822-1908, pp. 235-240.
  7. ^ CCC Boston, 1822-1908, p. 235.
  8. ^ a b CCC Boston, 1822-1908, p. 238.
  9. ^ a b c d Waters, Henry Fritz-Gilbert Waters (1872), The New England Historical and Genealogical Register and Antiquarian Journal, Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, p. 321 
  10. ^ a b c Waters (1872), p. 322.
  11. ^ a b Mayors of Boston: An Illustrated Epitome of who the Mayors Have Been and What they Have Done, Boston, MA: State Street Trust Company, 1914, p. 23 
  12. ^ CCC Boston, 1822-1908, pp. 241-244.
  13. ^ a b c The New England Historical and Genealogical Register, Volume XXVI, Boston, MA: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1872, p. 321 
Political offices
Preceded by
John P. Bigelow
Mayor of Boston, Massachusetts
January 5, 1852 - January 2, 1854
Succeeded by
Jerome V. C. Smith
Preceded by
George Stillman Hillard
President of the Common Council of
Boston, Massachusetts

July 1, 1847 - January 7, 1850
Succeeded by
Francis Brinley