Bilton School

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Bilton School - A Maths and Computing College
Biltonschoolva1.png
Motto Proud of our school; confident in our potential; positive about our future. Believe in Bilton.
Established 1977
Type Secondary Academy
Religion Mixed studies
Headteacher Ms P Weighill
Location Lawford Lane
Rugby
Warwickshire
CV22 7JT
England Coordinates: 52°21′47″N 1°17′49″W / 52.36318°N 1.29700°W / 52.36318; -1.29700
Local authority Warwickshire
DfE URN 125749 Tables
Ofsted Reports
Students 1425
Gender Coeducational
Ages 11–18
Colours Light Blue -KS3
Navy -KS4 Boys
Red -KS4 Girls
Website www.biltonschool.co.uk/en/

Bilton School (formerly Herbert Kay and Westlands School, and most recently Bilton High School) is a major secondary school for pupils aged 11–18 situated within the village of Bilton within Rugby, Warwickshire. It is a specialist Maths and Computing College and has academy status.

Uniform[edit]

The new intake in 2011 was the first to wear Bilton's new uniform, this consists of a Black Blazer with the Bilton School lion emblazed upon, a light grey jumper or cardigan, a white shirt and black trousers or skirt(knee-length or longer). Also, the students have to wear a tie to finish off this smart uniform. Boys and girls in years 7-9 wear light blue ties. In year 10-11, boys wear navy and girls wear raspberry red. Year 11 students have the option to wear a blazer, or to just wear a cardigan/jumper. In summer, students will be told when non-blazer days are. Usually they are not allowed to take their blazers off unless told in lessons. Non-blazer days will enable students to take them off when going around and to/from school.

Herbert Kay and Westlands School[edit]

While named as such, the school was split into two segments, one containing a girls only school the other for male pupils. As the school is now co-ed it retains a sense of nostalgia by keeping the original terms as classroom titles, thus each side is now simply titled Kay Side and West Side which originate from the old school name, Herbert Kay and Westlands School.

Bilton High School[edit]

While named Bilton High School, the School ran into confusion with the simple logo that was emblazoned upon its jumpers. The emblem B.H.S was criticised for its similarity to the logo of popular department store British Home Stores. Thus the school acted quickly to change its School symbol to the Bilton Lion with Bilton written underneath.

The consequence and award/achievement system[edit]

In around 1999 the school adopted its "consequence" system, part of the Bilton "Achievement" and Recognition System, within which pupils would be issued with certain consequences for bad behaviour during form time. The consequences or "Cs" as they were known with pupils were as follows:

  • C1 - A Verbal warning
  • C2 - A further verbal warning
  • C3 - Lines, which were completed and placed in a small postbox outside the year head's office the next day
  • C4 - Detention and lines
  • C5 - Immediate isolation with detention and lines. If this consequence was issued, the teacher would immediately call (often via phone) for a senior member of staff, who would escort the pupil to a top floor room on Kay side filled with empty filing cabinets.

In 2004 the system changed again. No longer using the concept of Cs (although very similar) to represent different levels of consequences a new set of punishments was derived:

  • Warning
  • Formal warning
  • Referral (an SMS text home to parents)
  • Detention after school
  • Straight isolation or removal into another classroom

Detentions and isolations are also accompanied by an SMS text home to parents to inform them of what had taken place. The SMS text system is also used to inform parents of other incidences such as the pupil not registering during form time, or an exceptional piece of work being handed in.

In 2010 a 'stamp' system was introduced. The students are issued with a planner at the beginning of the year with spaces for stamps which are given at the end of each lesson. The stamps reflect the student's behaviour during each lesson:

  • Subject/Faculty stamp - if the student has performed well and completed the tasks set.
  • You Can Do Better - if the student has been told off several times or not completed the work to the best of their ability.
  • NIL - if the student is removed from lesson, has done very little/no work.
  • No Homework - if they haven't appropriately done homework/done none at all.
  • No Equipment - if the student has none/ forgotten some of their subject equipment.
  • No PE Kit - if the pupil has forgotten their PE Kit (they can borrow a kit, but still have to get the stamp)
  • Uniform - if the pupil has chewed gum or their uniform is not appropriate.
  • Late(pupil's fault) - issued with this stamp if they arrive less than 5 minutes/later than the lesson starts.
  • Late(by bus) - issued with a special coloured (purple) late stamp, if it is the bus that has made them late. {The student will get their form stamp at the end of the day, as it wasn't their fault, providing they haven't got any bad stamps}
  • Merits - The teachers are allowed to give 3 merits out per lesson, these may go to several or one person.

At the end of the school day, each student goes to their form room. Here, they receive a tutor stamp if they have had all subject stamps. If not, they get a you can do better (even if they have had all subject stamps but behaved inappropriately during tutor time).

School times and timetable[edit]

In 2010, the school time changed to 8:45–15:05 instead of 9:00–15:30. That will mean that students have to get to school a little earlier, break is 15 minutes instead of 20, lunch is half an hour instead of 40 minutes and form time is at the end of the day, taking up 20 minutes instead of thirty.

Also, to make things easier, there is now a 1 week timetable opposed to two. This all means that the school day is simplified and made shorter, having school clubs in form time. Extracurricular clubs are after school.

Trivia[edit]

- The School's Teachers regularly produce a music video for the students that are leaving at the end of the year. The teacher's 2010 rendition of "Don't stop believing" was so popular, it became a YouTube hit and was featured on FOX News in America.[1]

2010: "Don't stop believing"[2]

2011: "Fireworks"[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fox News. "Teacher's give "Glee" to class". Bilton Digital. Retrieved 17 October 2013. 
  2. ^ YouTube. "2010 Don't Stop Believing video". Bilton Digital. Retrieved 17 October 2013. 
  3. ^ YouTube. "2011 Fireworks video". Bilton Digital. Retrieved 17 October 2013.